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Everyman Minis: Malborgoroth
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/17/2017 05:37:58

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This Everyman mini clocks in at 8 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 3 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, what is a malborgoroth? Something really cool. You know how the cult-critter flumph is a representation of the weird good guys, the foes of the Dark Tapestry. Okay, now combine these with one of Final Fantasy’s most notorious foes – the Marlboro/Morbol! Add a dash of lovecraftiana et voilà – we have the critter in question!

The creature clocks in at CR 13. Its stingers inject acid for continuous damage, which is nasty; they can bury their tentacles into the ground to duplicate black tentacles and remain stationary. They are poisonous and have starflight, can emit entangling, acidic belches and are capable of starflight. The critter has impressive defensive capabilities, ensuring that it won’t be killed right off by potent PCs…and even better, the creature gets the FF-monster’s gloriously vile super-debuff/condition-heaping breath. Epic!

Even better, we don’t just get stats – the pdf weaves a tale of the creature’s origin in detail, providing ample inspiration – oh, and we get 2 CR+0 variants – a cold-based variant and a fire-based one.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no hiccups on either formal or rules-language level. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming’s nice 2-column full-color standard for the series. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length. The artwork provided for the creature is cool as well.

Alexander Augunas once again proves that he can craft thoroughly amazing monsters – from the inspiration to the execution, this critter is inspired and worth the asking price. Highly recommended! 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Malborgoroth
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Everyman Minis: Unchained Kangaroos
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/15/2017 06:07:45

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This everyman mini clocks in at 10 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 4 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 3 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, why unchain the kangaroo? Well, they don’t trap foes like e.g. wolves and analogue creatures: They actually have claws. And even the front paws aren’t as harmless as they look. Hence, we get cool alternate stats for unchained kangaroo animal companion stats on the first page – no complaints regarding them in comparison to other animal companion stats. (They advance at 4th level, just fyi.)

The regular kangaroo presented herein would be a CR ½ creature, whose kick causes bludgeoning and piercing damage (which can be a bit odd in DR-interaction) and a threat-range of 19-20. They can’t kick as part of a full attack unless their BAB is equal to or exceeds +6. Crits with kicks can disembowel you, causing bleeding wounds and Con-damage – OUCH!

Things get cooler, though – there’s a second statblock in here. Jack. Jack isn’t like other kangaroos. He is actually an awakened unarmed fighter 5 that uses Everyman gaming’s cool Unchained Fighter-rules. He is quick, deadly, and damn cool!

Oh, and folks observing him have reverse engineered his fighting tricks – represented by a Style-feat chain: Kangaroo Style decreases the penalty to feint non-humanoids to -2, -4 against animal intelligence foes. Additionally, high ranks in Acrobatics increase the bonuses gained from fighting defensively or using the total defense action. The feat also doubles as both Acrobatic and Combat Expertise for the purpose of prerequisites. The follow-up feat is Kangaroo Gait, who allows you to feint as a swift action when moving more than 10 ft. When using Spring Attack, you can instead feint the target as a free action. Kangaroo Roundhouse, the third feat in the chain, lets you add Acrobatic ranks to the damage roll on all successful attacks versus a target you feinted successfully via Kangaroo gait, replacing Strength modifier. Kudos: Feat takes the Vital Strike chain into account.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are excellent, I noticed no hiccups. Layout adheres to a two-column standard with a printer-friendly, white background. The full-color artwork is nice. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at its length.

Alexander Augunas’ unchained kangaroos are amazing. The critter is cool. The companion stats are nice. The awakened character? Glorious. The feats are interesting as well – what’s not to like? My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Unchained Kangaroos
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The Genius Guide to the Cruorchemist
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/10/2017 11:38:13

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This base-class clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 3 pages of SRD, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

All right, the cruorchemist class gets d8 HD, 4 + Int skills per level, proficiency with simple weapons and light armors, though they do suffer from arcane spell failure. The cruorchemist gains ¾ BAB-progression and good Fort- and Ref-saves. The class has a pretty unique spellcasting engine: Cruorchemists distill their own, potent blood and store it in small vials, producing so-called distillations. The cruorchemist can consume a number of distillations equal to 1 + 1 + the cruorchemist’s Intelligence modifier as a swift action. Like spell components, they are consumed as part of casting a spell. At 1st level, the cruorchemist gains 3 + Constitution modifier distillations, with 5th level and every 5 levels thereafter increasing the distillations by +1. Preparing a distillation requires 1 hour – quite long. Not sure if that isn’t supposed to mean distillation process in total.

Okay, so these tie in with two other components of spellcasting etc.: The cruorchemist chooses a sorceror’s bloodline at 1st level. The cruorchemist doesn’t get bloodline spells or bonus feats and may not activate bloodline powers, unless consuming a distillation. The cruorchemist does gain the class skill associated with the bloodline. The cruorchemist gains spellcasting drawn from the sorcerer/wizard list of up to 6th level, using Intelligence as governing attribute. However, unlike in most cases, the cruorchemist gets spontaneous spellcasting in spite of using Intelligence as governing spellcasting attribute. However, the distillations do allow for more flexibility – the cruorchemist can consume distillations to cast spells known. In order to do so, he must consume a number of them equal to the spell’s level. The spell must be known, obviously. Minor complaint: The engine should mention that distillations can only be used to cast spells gained from the cruorchemist class, otherwise, the front-loaded distillation can allow for a bit of a strong synergy with some classes.

At 2nd level, the cruorchemist gains distill mutagen, which can be drunk as a standard action. One physical ability score is chosen: Strength, Dexterity, Constitution. This ability score gains a +4 alchemical bonus, the cruorchemist gets +2 natural armor bonus and the cruorchemist takes the usual -2 penalty to a mental ability score. As always, other characters shouldn’t drink this stuff. Effects last 10 minutes per class level…and the ability unfortunately does not specify how many mutagens the cruorchemist can brew per day – while it’s easy enough to default to the alchemist’s rules, it’s still a flaw.

Starting at 3rd level, the cruorchemist can use his distillations to pay for the spell level increase instead. While it is clear from the context how this is supposed to work, it should be noted that the ability’s wording is a tad bit wonky. 9th level allows the cruorchemist to apply the effects of metamagic feats to bloodline powers…which may be non-functional, depending on the bloodline chosen. A tad bit weird as well: 4th level and 7th as well as every other levels thereafter yield a metamagic feat – but aforementioned distillation/metamagic ability is gained at 3rd level, which means there’s a solid chance the ability won’t do anything for 1 level.

Starting at 6th level, the cruorchemist gains a metaspell slot: These are quasi-spellslots that allow for the use of metamagic to enhance spells beyond the level the cruorchemist could usually cast. At 6th level, a cruorchemist could e.g. cast a sickening magic missile. The metaspell slot itself is not expended, however, the ability cannot be cheesed – why? Because the cost for distillation still acts as a limiter and since this hypothetic spellslot is not consumed, it requires the consumption of distillations and regular spell slots in a combination that would sum up to the costs. 8th level and every other level increases the ability to cast thus metamagically enhanced spells by +1 – at 20th level, they could e.g. cast a quickened level 6 spell via a hypothetical 10th level metamagic spell slot. This ability is pretty complex and its presentation could be slightly clearer, but yeah – interesting.

7th level provides a homunculus, as via Craft Construct, and uses a distillation to activate it – one distillation keep it active for 24 hours. Starting at 10th level, the cruorchemist gains the ability to enhance the homunculus. They include extra eyes, acid breath, SP, spitting poison, better hides, etc. – these are nice and require distillations to activate. They last for 10 minutes per caster level and an additional such enhancement is learned at 14th and 20th level. Okay…so what action is feeding the homunculus the distillation? Unfortunately, the ability doesn’t specify and the alck of an ability type means that I can’t even resort to a default.

The pdf does sport a couple of supplemental options: 4 feats are included: Aspect of the Homunculus lets the cruorchemist temporarily assume characteristics of a homunculus. Problem: The rules-text implies that the feat transfers the abilities from a homunculus, but prerequisite-wise, the feat only lists distillation, which makes it a bit confusing. Extra distillation nets you +1 distillation (and may not be taken multiple times). Enhance Familiar allows you to use distillations to enhance familiars as though they were homunculi and Craft Advanced Homunculus nets homunculi you make the advanced creature template at +50% cost.

The class also comes with an archetype, the cruormorph. These guys lose spells, but may use distillations to cast bloodline spells as SPs in addition to the usual bloodline power activation. At 3rd level the archetype replaces metadistillation with the ability to apply metamagic feats to bloodline powers or bloodline spells. More on this particular aspect in the conclusion. 7th level replaces the metaspellslot with the ability to craft a specific distillation that allows her to apply the effect of a homunculus enhancement to herself, lasting 5 minutes + 1 minute per class level. 10th level and every 3 levels thereafter yield an additional enhancement. Okay, do these cost additional distillations? Or are the additional homunculus tricks part of the one distillation? At 10th level, the cruormorph can apply metamagic feats known to self-enhancements. Wut? Also: ALL abilities of the archetype lack ability types and are improperly formatted.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good on a formal level. On a rules-language level, the pdf feels…rushed. While the class is mostly intact, it does suffer from being rather hard to grasp, in spite of its brevity. Some cleaning up would have greatly enhanced this. The pdf comes with a solid 2-column full-color layout and decent stock art. The pdf is fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Frustrating. That’s pretty much how I’d describe the experience of reviewing this class. Why? Because the engine of the class, with all its complexities, is REALLY cool and interesting. Tim Hitchcock’s cruorchemist looks like a class that can actually make metamagic matter more.

That being said, the class also is very rough around the edges, so let’s go through it: Beyond item activation not being properly noted for some abilities, the pdf also sports a couple of seriously rough patches regarding the explanation of how the components of the class work. However, that alone wouldn’t suffice to bring it down. However, we also have some issues in formatting…and then there is the elephant in the room.

You see, the class endeavors to treat bloodline powers like spells. As though they could all be enhanced like spells. That is clearly not the case. While basic metamagic and condition-addition etc. work well enough, bloodline powers can cover a VERY WIDE range of different tricks. And many of these tricks and how they interact with metamagic get really, really wonky. Really fast. As in: I wouldn’t ever want to decide the precise effects while behind the screen. Now, there are complex rules-syntax constructs that could have covered them all – I’ve seen it done, more than once. Heck, I’ve done it myself. However, this pdf leaves you alone with this HUGE problem.

Okay, so you get a damaging aura. How do conditions apply? Hmm? How do natural weapons and the feats interact? How do action economy changes work? A significant component, perhaps THE most significant component of the class, doesn’t work and needs copious amounts of GM fiat. That’s no good.

There is also the aspect of the homunculus. It feels tacked on. As a pet, it is an afterthought at best compared to other classes. It’s gained VERY late and doesn’t really bring that much to the table – why not have a pet from level 1 or 4 onwards? Or, you know, none and instead more customization? The archetype is basically non-functional as written.

Damn, this breaks my heart. This pdf sports several red flags that tell me that something went wrong in a revision, that it wasn’t playtested sufficiently or that it was rushed. Gaining abilities that may quite frankly be useless for a whole level, for example. Or the hand-waved bloodline power/metamagic-interaction. The whole class doesn’t feel like a final release, but like a draft. You know, the thing you send to the publisher for feedback, then expand and clean up into the finished product. It’s sad, really, for I can see the 5-star potential that the class undoubtedly has. As written, though, I cannot recommend it. My final verdict will clock in at 2.5 stars, rounded down. I hope for a revision.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The Genius Guide to the Cruorchemist
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Blood Space and Moon Dust
by Dillard R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/10/2017 01:32:44

Bottom Line Up Front (BLUF): Great adventure well worth the price. This is a very reasonably priced alternative to the Adventure Path adventures from Paizo.

Art: 4/5 Not the same style as the Starfinder CRB, but effective! There aren't many pictures but they will give your PCs a good idea of what they are looking at/interacting with.

Layout:5/5 Use of two columns, multiple fonts and colors, as well as text boxes to set off important information makes finding and reading the document quite easy.

Execution: 5/5 This is execution of story objectives. Very well done. The NPCs motivations and plans are laid out in black and white. The GM should have no trouble ad libbing when (not if) his/her PCs go off script. Each NPC has tactics laid out sometimes round to round. Nothing seems to be disjointed with each transition between scenes logically progressing the story without forcing the PCs on any set path. Information is laid out in tables that cover most of the possible questions that PCs would ask (or try to learn). Included in the adventure are 4 very detailed pre-gen PCs using only the Starfinder CRB. There is also a ship for the PCs.

Story: 5/5 The story is imaginative. The back story is effectively told in a very concise manner. (The PCs get to learn about Blood Space literally from the moment they start the adventure) PCs don't get bogged down with exposition, but learn through the action. The pacing for the most part is quite fast paced, however, there are opportunities to slow things down to allow the PCs time to acclimate themselves to this new star system introduced by RGG.

PS: Starfarer's Companion goes into greater detail about the star system (and new classes, races, feats and more), but is not necessary to play this adventure. I really appreciate that RGG went to the trouble to make this adventure work for purchasers of just the CRB as well as folks who buy the Companion.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blood Space and Moon Dust
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Everyman Minis: Way of the Eight
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/09/2017 04:48:55

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Everyman Minis-series clocks in at 7 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page advertisement, 1.5 pages of SRD, leaving us with 2.5 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

On the first page, next to the introduction, we are greeted by supplemental material – this time around, that would be 3 new feats: Eight Steps Acolyte, Eight Steps Initiate and Eight Steps Master.

But before we can take a look at them…what is this “Way of the Eight”? Well, it basically is a philosophical concept that revolves around transcending the physical limitations – it is thus geared towards martially-inclined characters. Only characters with ki, martial flexibility or stamina may attempt climbing the 8 steps – note that Combat Stamina does not suffice. Additionally, the character must have the Endurance feat. Beginning to ascend the Way of the Eight costs a swift action and 1 point ki, 1 use of martial flexibility, or 2 stamina. Stamina thus spent may not be recovered until the character has finished 8 hours of rest. On subsequent rounds, the character may expend additional uses/points and actions to ascend further. Alternatively, a character may ascend multiple steps at once as a full-round action, with costs being cumulative. A limitation regarding steps would be the base attack bonus (cool!) – in order to ascend to a step, the character’s BAB must be twice the step’s number. Step 3 would hence require a BAB of +6 or higher. Each round while the practitioner has ascended at least one step, she takes nonlethal damage equal to twice the number of steps ascended – 8 while on 4th step, for example. When using a full-round action to hasten along the journey, the character takes nonlethal damage equal to 10 times the step ascended to. Nonlethal damage thus incurred can’t be reduced or redirected, nor can they be healed unless the character has been reduced “below 1st” (here, “step” is missing) and rested for 10 minutes. Creatures immune to nonlethal damage can’t ascend on the way.

Ascending on the way grants a number of special abilities, dependant on the step, and a practitioner can remain ascended for a number of rounds equal to the character’s Constitution score – after that, it requires further ki/martial flexibility/stamina expenditure to remain ascended. If lethal and nonlethal hit point damage exceed maximum hit points, the character similarly crashes down. After losing the steps, the character remains exhausted for a number of minutes equal to the highest step reached.

Okay, that out of the Way: The Initiate feat lets you ascend as a free action, but not more than once per round. You can use it in conjunction with the usual activation actions (allowing you to take 2 steps sans the full-round action extra nonlethal damage). The Acolyte feat decreases the rank of the step by one for purpose of nonlethal damage incurred. Okay, does that mean no damage from step 1? Not sure there. The Master feat lets you retain the abilities unlocked for Constitution score minutes, with nonlethal damage only once per minute.

Okay, so what do these steps net you? First, a HD-governed atk and damage boost; at 2nd level damage die increase for weapon attacks, as though affected by lead blades/gravity bow. Step 3 nets more movement, short-burst Fly (must end on surface) and slowed falls. Step 4 nets an AC and Reflex-save boost governed by steps, as well as a DR (which is halved versus adamantine – interesting!). Step 5 nets supernatural versions of scorching ray (free) and cone of cold, fireball, lightning bolt (cost ki/martial flexibility/stamina) that deal force damage. These are SUs, with CL based on BAB and Constitution as DC-governing attribute. Step 6 nets haste. Step 7 makes movement instantaneous – the practitioner disappears and reappears at the place in question. No AoOs from foes sans Combat reflexes. For double the usual activation cost (2/2/4), the character can grant himself the benefits of displacement. (Italicization is missing.) Step 8 provides basically advantage (rolling twice, take better result) for all ability and skill checks, attacks and saves. The practitioner doesn’t lose steps upon being reduced to 0 hp, gains ferocity and adds BAB to Constitution score to determine negative hit point thresholds before dying.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are pretty good, I noticed no glaring hiccups. Layout adheres to Everyman gaming’s nice two-column standard and the full-color art is ncie. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Luis Loza’s “Way of the Eight” is an interesting twist on the design-paradigm of chakras presented in Occult Adventures – the flexibility and relatively painless options to ascend make sense. In fact, I could see this concept carry a whole series of pdfs or a bigger file, all with different ways. This is an interesting, fun offering. Now, personally, I would have enjoyed slightly more unique benefits from the steps, but of well – can’t have everything, right? As a whole, I enjoyed this. My final verdict will hence clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Way of the Eight
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Star Log.EM-001: Exocortex Options
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/08/2017 05:16:21

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This small supplement for Starfinder clocks in at 8 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of advertisement, 1.5 pages of SRD, leaving us with 2.5 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, this time around,w e take a look at new options for the exocortex choice of the mechanic – at 2nd level or higher, mechanics get 3 new choices for mechanic tricks: Enemy database builds on combat tracking: When you’re tracking a foe, you may substitute Computers to identify the tracked creature instead of using the usual skill; however, failed attempts can only be retried after 10 minutes, at which point you may take 20 on the skill as though accessing a database. The Exocortex datajack makes the exocortex count as a datajack with an item level equal to your mechanic level, allowing for combination with a custom rig. If connected to a network or data set, you may make Computers to recall information related to a variety of skills. As per the clarification-request of one of my readers: The exocortex gains the ability to work as a datajack, freeing your brain augment slot. This exocortex datajack may by used with custom rigs, etc.

Improved combat tracking lets you attempt an identification of a tracked creature when attacking with a special property or small/long arm – on a success, the attack deals + class level damage. This stacks with Weapon Specialization. Only one target takes this bonus damage, if multiple ones are targeted.

There also are 3 tricks unlocked at 8th level – the first would be AI Usurpation: The exocortex must have access to the system to hack and uploading the exocortex into the system is a move action – a total of 2d4 rounds need to be expended thus, and the exocortex uploaded behaves like an AI using your social skills and only obeys your spoken command. While thus uploaded, you lose all exocortex abilities and mechanic tricks tied to the exocortex. Instead, you gain an untyped bonus on all Computer, Engineering and Piloting checks involving the hacked vessel. Additionally, this bonus extends to starship stunts and crew actions and you may spend 1 Resolve Point at the start of the round to gain an additional crew action. If unused, said action is lost, as is the Resolve Point. Downloading the AI again also takes time, and losing it lets you replace it without much hassle. While uploaded, the AI can’t fill a starship crew role.

Martial rewire lets you treat your mechanic level as BAB for prerequisite purposes of combat feats. You select 3 combat feats for which you meet the prerequisites. As a move action, you can have your muscle memory rewired, gaining one of these feats until you spend a Resolve Point and have a 10-minute rest to regain Stamina, at which point you can change the feat you have access to. Upon gaining a level, you can change the combat feats in question. Enhanced memory lets you reroll Int-based skill checks, even if not recalling. You may also spend 1 Resolve Point as a reaction to failing such a check, gaining a reroll at +5.

Finally, there are two tricks that are unlocked at 14th level – the first of these would be construct usurpation, which does what it says on the tin, thankfully with a CR-cap and a temporary duration – this duplicates control machines (not italicized) in a way, with the AI handling concentration, allowing you to act normally. Nice balancing tool: 1/24 hour caveat. Enhanced martial rewire nets you a second set of 3 combat feats to choose from, and allows you to access two of your pool of 6 at once.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting, on both a formal and a rules-language level, are very good. No complaints here, apart from a missed italicization. Layout adheres to a nice, colorful two-column full-color standard. The artwork featured is nice and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Alexander Augunas’ exocortex options makes sense to me – while the added crew action is potent, it makes sense to me – so do the virtual feats. Note that RAW, martial rewiring does not allow you to stack combat feats due to the prerequisite fulfillment caveat, which prevents abuse of feat trees there – breadth instead of depth. As a whole, I enjoyed this supplement and consider it to be a sensible addition to the mechanic’s options. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Log.EM-001: Exocortex Options
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Starfarer's Companion
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/07/2017 09:55:20

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive expansion-tome for Starfinder clocks in at 235 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 229 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This review was moved up in my reviewing-queue as a prioritized review.

Okay, so the content herein is contextualized by the Xa-Osoro system – while we only get a brief introduction to this meta-setting, it does influence components of the following material – for example, the languages, which are noted in the beginning of the race section. Speaking of which: This is basically a massive crunch-book that takes care of several concepts that are beloved, yet not already covered by SFRPG; as such, we begin with races. A ton of them. As such, the respective racial write-ups note homeworlds, society and alignment, etc. I’ll be brief regarding the races, since most of them should be familiar to PFRPG players.

Aasimars: +2 to one ability, 4 hp, resistance to acid, cold and electricity (“resistance” is missing once, in a purely cosmetic hiccup) as well as SR equal to 6 + character level versus evil spells. They gain +2 to Diplomacy, Perception and Intimidate, have darkvision and can manifest a halo, which acts as a portable light with an item level equal to or less than the aasimar’s level. I assume that to be “character level” – minor hiccup in the rules here that happens twice – also in regards to the Daylight 1/day SP.

Catfolk gain +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Wis, 4 hp, +2 on Reflex saves (and 1/day roll twice, take the better result), low-light vision, +2 to Perception, Stealth and Survival and +10 ft. when charging, running or withdrawing.

The deoxyian race would be all new: They gain 6 hp and choose a player race at 1st level. They count as the chosen race and as deoxyians and develop a racial trait of the chosen race. More can be chosen by taking Expanded Deoxyomorphism as a replacement feature at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th or 18th level. They gain +2 Int, +2 to an ability of their choice and -2 to an ability of their choice that does not already have a “bonus from race.” 1/day, they can take 10 on a d20 roll or check (except those failing on a natural 1) and gain +1 to checks they take 10 in.

Dhampirs get +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Con, 4 hp low-light vision and darkvision and are dazzled in bright lights. They gain +2 to Perception and Bluff and when saving against disease and mind-affecting effects and take no penalties from level drain, though they still can perish from accrued negative levels.

Grippli (YEAH!) get +2 Dex and Wis, -2 Str, 2 hp, speed 20 ft. (plus climbing speed 20 ft.), +2 to Stealth, darkvision, +4 to Athletics made to jump (and are treated as having a running start). They also secrete poison 1/day as a swift action (which passes grippli armor to be on the outside of it – think semi-permeable membrane) and may coat their melee weapons in the poison.

Ifrit gain +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Wis, 4 hp, darkvision and may create the flashlight equivalent of flame as a free action. 1/day, as a standard action, the ifrit can generate a firebomb with an item level equal to the ifrit’s level (should be character level). They gain +2 to saves versus fire-based effects and +2 to initiative.

Of course, we also get Kitsune, who gain +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Str, 4 hp, +2 to Acrobatics and Athletics, change shape and Kitsune with Cha of 11+ gain at-will dancing light. They may choose Magical Tail as a replacement class feature at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th, and 18th level. They also gain low-light vision and their natural weapons deal 1d3 lethal damage and isn’t treated as archaic – analogue to the Vesk ability.

Kobolds get +2 Dex and Con, -2 Str, 2 hp, are Small, get +1/2 level (should be character level) to damage rolls with attacks and spells versus foes that are flat-footed, off-kilter or denied their Dexterity bonus. They get +2 Engineering, Perception, Profession and Stealth. They also gain a 1d2 natural weapon, otherwise analogue in function to the Vesk. They gain +1 resolve point at 1st level and have darkvision and are dazzled in bright light.

Mechanoi are sentinet constructs with the technological subtype. They have a size of Small or Medium, speed 20 ft. and have no Constitution score. Problem here: Having one ability score less does influences character creation/point assignment – the pdf should acknowledge that and provide alternate. The race gets +2 Str and Int, -2 Cha, 6 hp, +4 to saves versus mind-affecting effects (and no immunity). Spells that target constructs or robots and don’t allow for saves now do for the race, with an engineer. They take -2 to Sense Motive and such checks against them are also at +2 DC. They also get to choose to minor mods and a major mod, which work as basic drone mods. Once chosen, this can be changed via a mnemonic editor. Additional Mechanoi Mod may be chosen as replacement feature at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 18th level. Mechanoi have low-light vision.

Nagaji get +2 Str and Cha, -2 Int, 6 hp, +1 to AC, low-light vision, +2 to Perception, +2 to saves versus poison and mind-affecting effects. They can spit poison as a ranged attack versus EAC, 10 ft. range and one range increment. The poison temporarily blinds foes on a failed save and may be used 1/day.

Oread get +2 Str and Wis, -2 Cha, 8(!!!) hp, 20 ft. speed, darkvision, +1 to AC, 1d3 natural weapon (analogue to Vesk) and +2 to saves versus acid- and earth-based effects and attacks. They also get acid resistance 5.

Samsarans receive +2 Int and Wis, -2 Con, 4 hp, low-light vision, +2 to saves versus death- and negative-energy effects and to saves to remove negative levels, They also get +2 to Constitution checks to stabilize. They get one 0-level mystic spell as an at-will SP and may choose Minor Psychic Power sans meeting the prerequisite. They gain +2 to two skills of their choice and add them to their list of class skills.

Suli get +2 Str and Cha, -2 Int, 4 hp and low-light vision. They gain acid resistance, cold resistance, electricity resistance and fire resistance 5. As a swift action 1/day, they can shroud their arms in elemental energy (4 types mentioned before), for +1d6 damage of the chosen type to “all attacks made with their hands or weapons held in their hands.” – I think this is supposed to refer to melee weapons, but RAW, it holds true for ranged weapons as well, which is a serious difference regarding the power of the ability. The ability lasts for 1 round per character level.

Sylphs have +2 Dex and Int, -2 Con, 2 hp, darkvision, +2 to Acrobatics, Piloting and Stealth. They gain electricity resistance and +2 to saves versus air- and electricity-based effects. They can use Acrobatics to glide. They also increase their maneuverability by one step. Tengus get +2 Dex and Wis, -2 Con, low-light vision, +2 to Culture checks (and learn 2 languages per rank in Culture gained). They get +2 to Perception and Stealth and natural weapons (1d3); they are proficient with basic and advanced melee weapons and gain specialization with them at 3rd level.

Tieflings get +2 Dex and Int, -2 Cha, 4 hp, darkvision, +2 to Bluff, Slight of Hand, Stealth. They get cold, electricity and fire resistance 5 as well as SR 6 + character level against good spells. They gain a fiendish extremity and may choose to gain one as a replacement feature at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 18th level. These include a prehensile tail, scaly skin, natural weapons and vestigial wings.

Undine gain +2 Dex and Wis, -2 Str, 4 hp, swim speed 30 ft., can breathe water and doesn’t take penalties when fighting underwater. They are immune to the effects of depth and pressure and gain Athletics as a class skill as well as darkvision. They can quench up to 5 sq-ft. fire with a touch sans taking damage and 1/day may execute bull rush, disarm, dirty trick (blind/dazzle only) or trip with a 30 ft.-range. They can use their character level instead of BAB for the roll. Problem: The ability doesn’t specify the activation action – I assume standard action. They get +2 to saves versus cold-and water-based effects.

Vanara get +2 Wis, 4 hp, are shapechangers, with 30 ft. speed, 20 ft. climbing speed, may change size between Small and Medium and, while Small, they get +2 Dex and -2 Str, but their Dex in medium armor may not exceed 16. Longtails get +2 Acrobatics, Sleight of Hand and Stealth and have a prehensile tail that can hold +1 item at the ready. Whitecape vanara get +2 Athletics, Intimidate and Perception, Improved Unarmed Strike and +2 to KAC versus bull rush and trip. They gain low-light vision.

Vishkanya get +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Wis, 4 hp, get +5 Disguise to pass as humans, +2 to Acrobatics and Stealth, low-light vision, +character level as a bonus to saves versus poison. When they have taken at least 1 hp damage, as a swift action, they can 1/day apply their poisonous blood (saliva sans damage) to melee weapons. Wayang get +2 Dex and Int, -2 Wis, 2 hp, 20 ft. speed. I am not sure regarding their size – I assume Small. The race gets darkvision. They can, as a standard action 1/day use invisibility as a SP. Wayang can reverse spells that behave differently versus undead/the living as a reaction, counting as undead or living, respectively. This can be used 1/day. They gain +2 Perceptio and Stealth and +2 to saves versus illusions.

All right, as a whole, the race-chapter has me a bit concerned. While there is no really broken race herein, there are a couple of races that exceed in power what we get in the Starfinder core book. More relevant would be the numerous cosmetic hiccups in rules-language (level vs. character level – particularly weird, since some abilities (like natural weapons) taken directly from the SF core book’s abilities often specify character level in the core book… There are also a few instances, where the rules are a bit wobbly. Not to the point where I’d consider the section problematic, but it’s less refined than what I’m used to see from the authors.

Okay, so next up would be no less than 6 (!!!) classes for SFRPG: We get an adaptation of bard, cleric, magus, paladin, ranger and wizard.

In all brevity: Bards get 6 + Con stamina, 6 hp, 6 + Int skills, proficiency with light armor, melee weapons, grenades and small arms. Spontaneous spellcasting of up to 6th level (governed by the muse – may be Int, Wis or Cha), ¾ BAB progression and good Ref- and Fort-saves. Okay, so the class itself probably doesn’t need a discussion on how it works, so let me note what I enjoyed here: Even bardic knowledge has choices; bardic performance is properly codified (Audible/Visual) and the class gets talents to choose, an array of two classes of talents, which allow for PC customization. Definitely one of the best bard versions for d20-based games.

The cleric gets 6 + Con stamina, 6 hp, 4 + Int skills, ¾ BAB-progression, good Fort- and Will-saves, proficiency with light and heavy armor, small arms, deity’s favored weapon, grenades and prepared spellcasting governed by Wisdom. Now here is an aspect that may provide a bit of confusion at first: Unlike in Starfinder’s usual design paradigm, the spellcasting of the cleric goes the full 9 levels; granted, some spells of the mystic or technomancer note that the higher-level cleric spells behave as lower-level mystic spells; and yes, there are a ton of converted spells. Similarly, the class provides AoE-healing via channel divinity – basically, you don’t have to choose to be the healer mystic, you get this regardless of choices made. On the plus-side, domains and devotions allow for a ton of customizations for the class, which, choice-wise, is really cool to see.

The magus presented herein gets 6 + Con stamina, 6 hp, 4 + Int skills, ¾ BAB-progression, good Fort- and Will-saves, prepared Int-based spellcasting of up to 6th level. Spellstrike is tied to resolve and works with both melee weapons and small arms. The class does what you’d expect.

The paladin gets 7 + Con stamina, 7 hp, 4 + Int skills, proficiency with light & heavy armor, basic and advanced melee weapons, small arms, longarms and heavy weapons. They have full BAB-progression and good Fort- and Will-saves. At 4th level, they get spontaneous Cha-based spellcasting of up to 4th level, drawn from the cleric list. Lay on hands has nice limits and is tied to resolve. The customization comes in with different oaths and associated abilities. Solid version.

The ranger gets 7 + Con stamina, 7 hp, 4 + Int skills, proficiency with light armor, basic and advanced melee weapons, small arms, longarms, sniper rifles and grenades, full BAB-progression, good Fort- and Ref-saves. Beyond tracking, rangers come with a more complex modification – their styles allow for meaningful choices. Spells, for example, are spontaneous, Wis-based and drawn from the mystic’s list and are exclusive to one style. There also are a ton of talents, ranger methodologies that help, big time, to make the class feel unique.

Finally, the wizard gets 4 + Con stamina, 4 hp, 4 + Int skills per level, proficiency with light armor, basic melee weapons, small arms, grenades, ½ BAB-progression, good Will-saves, prepared Int-based spellcasting from the wizard’s list. Much like the cleric, the spell-levels go the full 9 levels of progression, thus deviating from Starfinder’s basic spellcasting engine. The wizard has a spellpad and the usual bond – object or familiar. There is a ton of customization via both arcane secrets and a massive array of arcane traditions. Notes for alternate or replaced class features are provided for all classes covered within this book.

The book does come with a nice companion-building engine that covers both biological and technological companions: Hit points scale up from 10 to 230; companions have ¾ BAB-progression, gain up to +18 AC; their good saves increase to +9, the bad saves to +5; 6 ability increases, up to 8 feats and up to 10 evolutions. Link, share spells, (improved) evasion, devotion – you get the idea here.

The book does contain a TON of feats – the table covers 3 pages on its own! Beyond the obvious ones (like Fox Shape, Magical tail, etc.) that supplement the races and those that supplement the classes, there are several rules-relevant ones beyond that. Though, much like in previous chapters, there are more editing hiccups here than usual for Rogue Genius Games or the authors – “as areactiont action”, for example. Options for paladins to revive those that have just died, better exploring of new environments – it should be noted that quite a few really cool options can be found in this chapter. There are quite a few feats here that allow for the use of limited racial abilities via Resolve expenditure. So yeah, this chapter, as a whole, is nice.

In the equipment chapter, things become really cool: We get not only various shields, we also are introduced to computers – to be used as basically a complex help or hindrance for the PCs – modules, basic functions, secured access, tier-rating,e tc. – all in all, a cool array with a ton of sample computers provided. I smiled from ear to ear when I read an expansion to the starship scale: Planetoid! It comes with a new frame and we also get a serious array of cool new frames. This is easily my favorite chapter in the whole book.

The final, approximately 60 pages, are devoted to a massive TON of spells. Since this book adds 9th level spellcasting to Starfinder, there are some explanations regarding variable level spells for the spells. The chapter, as a whole, provides a ton of the spell-classics we know from PFRPG – wail of the banshee, for example. It inflicts a massive 150 points of sonic damage, ½ on a successful save. If you are really picky about design-aesthetics, you will note that e.g. snuff life from the core-book follows a different design-paradigm that codifies damage for death effects by CR. On the plus-side, I really like that quite a lot of the spells have different effects for the different spell-levels – not just an escalation of numbers, but wholly different effects.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good on both a formal and rules-language level – as a whole, this book may contain quite a few hiccups, but most of them do not influence the rules-language. Layout adheres to a really nice two-column full-color standard with a lot of neat, original full-color artworks. The pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks. Cool: The pdf comes with a second, more tablet-friendly, smaller version – kudos!

Alexander Augunas and Matthew Morris deliver a book that a select clientele will absolutely adore. This massive tome nets you all the options you’ve come to expect from the time playing Pathfinder – the favorite races of many folks, and, more importantly, also the classes – if you’re looking for a way to transition your PFRPG-game to Starfinder, then get this ASAP – this is exactly the book you’ve been waiting for.

The craftsmanship of the design for the class conversions is definitely high quality; the player agenda components, the choices, the engines of the classes – all of these are done with the expert skill-set that we’ve come to expect from these two critically-acclaimed designers. I can absolutely see why so many people (judging from the reviews) love this book.

At the same time, as a person, while I appreciated the skill that obviously went into creating this book, the supplement left me honestly concerned. As a book that deals with a lot of heritage options, it does exhibit a lot of design paradigm decisions that I could not extrapolate from the Starfinder core rules. It should be noted that I do not think that 9th-level spell-progression breaks the game; it allows for a finer-grained progression of power, obviously – but honestly, I’m not sure why this type of decision was required by the demands of the system or the design of the classes. Another issue I can see here would be the cleric’s healing abilities, which are very pronounced – more so than those presented in the Starfinder core book. Why do I consider the totality of these design-choices problematic? While they remain closer to PFRPG and thus easier to convert, they change the gameplay of Starfinder.

While, admittedly, my playtesting experiences with the Starfinder rules so far are not as excessive (the system is pretty young, after all), so far, it looks like the discrepancy between the power of martials and casters has decreased, courtesy, in part, due to the cap imposed on casting potency. This book subverts these pretty central tenets. There are a few remnants regarding references to bonus types that don’t exist in Starfinder, some references to AC bonuses that have not been properly recoded for SFRPG, but these instances remain relatively scarce. More grievous to me, there are, design-wise, some aspects in spells, etc., that feel closer in their design-aesthetics to PFRPG than SFRPG.

Okay, so rating this book, for me, is pretty much a reviewer’s nightmare. Sure, I can complain about the formal hiccups mentioned, but they are not that many really bad ones; they mostly pertain to smaller aspects and components. My issue as a reviewer is that this book covers options to make Starfinder closer to Pathfinder. It’s the goal of the book and, for what they are, I love a lot of the designs here – I enjoyed, for example, the converted classes more than I thought I would. Here’s the thing: As a person, I really, really dislike that. One of the aspects I love about Starfinder is that it’s not just PFRPG with a coating of scifi. New races, new classes – all different, shiny, new.

I think that, for a serious part of this book, you can see that, while it is definitely a Starfinder book regarding the totality of the rules, its design aesthetics in the smaller components, tend to have sprinklings of PFRPG inside. This is understandable; it’s not bad…but it rubs me the wrong way and that sense, particularly combined with the hiccups here and there, left me with this constant feeling of unease regarding, particularly, the full casters herein. In short: This book was, most assuredly, not made for me.

At the same time, it is my responsibility as a reviewer to acknowledge that it represents what a TON of people wanted and enjoy – and, while not perfect, it does achieve its mission statement in a rather admirable manner. That’s why, ultimately, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up for the purpose of this platform. If you wanted more of your favorite PFRPG options in Starfinder, feel free to add another star.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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Everyman Unchained: Eidolons
by Kass K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/03/2017 16:14:08

No complaints at all on my end. I enjoyed this content. My players and i really made good use of it and my player playing a Summoner made great use of the new types and subtypes for eidolons. Great content.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Unchained: Eidolons
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Everyman Minis: Pumpkin Kami
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/01/2017 05:53:40

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Everyman Minis clocks in at 9 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 4 pages of SRD, leaving us with 3 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

We begin with a low-cost, cool class of magic item: Costumed confections are magical sweets that can be consumed to create a regular disguise, which does not modify your clothes (minor nitpick: spell reference not italicized); the second type transforms into a monstrous humanoid or humanoid, as per disguise self, affecting all senses (and no disbelieve). Finally youthful confections transforms the target into a younger version – all effects are polymorph effects and last for 4 hours. Cool!

The main meat of the pdf, though, would be the Kabochahito, the CR 7 pumpkin kami. And no, this is NOT another evil scarecrow/pumpkin monster – in fact, the kami is NG! It is incorporeal and conjure forth confections. Oh, and it comes with a TON of unique abilities: It can swallow beings and transform them into other shapes – the behavior of creatures is then made innocuous to onlookers. This can also be combined with a geas/quest – failure may see the target trapped in that form. Unlike most kami, kabochahitos can switch wards pretty quickly and assume pumpkin/plant-form with stat-modifications included. They can also generate massive growth spurts among plants. Big plus: Unlike many monsters, the kami is properly contextualized within the gaming world, with a lot of inspiring prose.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no serious hiccups. Layout adheres to the nice two-column standard of the series. The nice pieces of art are in full-color. The pdf does not come with bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Luis Loza’s pumpkin kami are amazing. They are creative, benevolent and fun; they can make for genius Halloween-themed adventures and are a welcome deviation from the well-tread path of evil pumpkin monsters. Interesting, creative – no complaints. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Pumpkin Kami
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Starfarer's Companion
by Paul M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/21/2017 07:47:12

Have had a chance to use several things from this book in actual play. The classes appear to be well balanced against the classes listed in the core book. After purchasing the core book, I would say that this would be the next book to purchase. Definitely recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Starfarer's Companion
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Everyman Minis: Mysteries of Summer
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/18/2017 04:16:46

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This Everyman Mini clocks in at 9 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page advertisement, 4 pages of SRD, leaving us with 2 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This Everyman Mini begins, as they all do, with a nice, brief introduction page that also contains, this time around, a new spell, namely the wall of light – this represents a blinding curtain of light (closing eyes can negate the blindness, unless passing through), and the wall is particularly potent versus creatures from the plane of shadow. Nice visuals! (Yeah, groan-worthy reviewer-pun. I know.)

The main meat of the mini is taken up, surprise, by the summer mystery, which adds Knowledge (nature), Perception, Survival and Swim to the list of class skills. Bonus spell-wise, we have a strong fire-and light-theme, starting off with produce flame and moving with unbearable brightness, the new spell and sirocco to the higher level sun- spells and finally, to fiery body. Now, unsurprisingly, we get the flame mystery’s heat aura (sans wasting the wordcount) among the revelations.

The revelations include a blistering touch that may stagger foes temporarily if they fail their save. Gaining Flaming Spell and being able to use it a number of times sans increasing the casting time…some solid tricks. I particularly liked Heatstroke, which can add fatigue (non-stacking) to spells with fire or light descriptors for a limited duration. I also am partial to Midsummer’s Dream, which generates a fascination-inducing effect that makes the creatures behave as though in their favorite summer retreat – and they even are warmed as though the dream was real! There is an amazing expedition to the frigid ridges angle herein! Pretty cool: There is a revelation that draws sustenance from the sun’s rays, including, at higher levels, the option to rest quicker – and kudos here, it does not break the usual limitations of spell preparation. A solar body form that can damage nearby targets and at higher level blinds them also makes for a nice image.

Gaining some illusion bonus spells is damn cool, as is being a summer child that can stand the heat. Finally, you can afflict foes with nasty sunburns with your light spells (slightly weird: fire is exempt here, when the other abilities all affect fire and light). The final revelation nets you a DC-increase and the option to cast 3/day miracle, but only to duplicate fire or light spells.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good on a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming’s two-column standard with a white background, making this relatively printer-friendly. The pdf sports a nice full-color artwork and has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Margherita Tramontano’s mysteries of summer are cool: The added effects, concisely-worded, make for a fun and tactical array of options and the revelations often are pretty creative. The dual focus of heat and light make sense and elevate this beyond being just another fire-specialist. That may just be me, but I had this vision of a lone oracle walking through the scorching, hot mesas with a smile on her face and a song on her lips. The revelations provide a variety of cool and meaningful options. My final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up for the purpose of this platform since the mystery manages to present a rather well-rounded array of options.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Mysteries of Summer
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Star Log.EM-003: Collateral Characters
by Kim F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/14/2017 04:13:58

Orignally reviewed over on the OpenGamingNetwork.

The following review is an OPINION piece and only reflects the opinion and tastes (because ultimately, all reviews will be based on personal taste) of the reviewer.

That disclaimer out of the way, let’s get on with the show!

This week we give you Star Log.EM-003: Collateral Characters!

Publisher: Rogue Genius Games Author: Alexander Augunas (AKA Alex Augunas) Cover Artist: Jacob E. Blackmon System: Starfinder Page count: 7 ( 1 page cover, 1 page credits, 3 pages content, 1 page OGL)

So, to start off with, we have a cover that shows us someone polishing an armor that uncannily reminds me of a Samurai version of Optimus Prime. When I originally saw it, I certainly didn’t think of a slave worker, more of a maintenance type character, but the image itself is evocative enough and is reused inside once more. I’m not sure how I feel about the pattern used as a background though, but it seems to vary according to each release.

(Disclaimer: Reading the sidebar on page 3, I can see that this has particular repercussions for anyone using Blood Space and Moon Dust and the Starfarer’s Companion, neither of which I had access to at the time of the review, so this review will stand on its own).

The introduction is an introduction to the Star Logs.Em releases and the sidebar does a good job of giving a feel for an Ex-Slave in the above-mentioned campaigns, though the grammar in it feels a little disjointed. A direct quote here is “Although three centuries have passed since, the Xa-Osoro System underwent a system-changing catastrophe called the Regicide when one of its binary stars, Osoro, suddenly imploded into a miniature black hole.” – It feels like that sentence should have been continued.

Next up we have a theme, that of the Collateral itself:

The Theme Knowledge ability of this Theme is nice, but it seems like it’s missing something. Other Theme Knowledge abilities mention 1 or 2 specific skills that it reduces the DC for in specific circumstances, and this does not. Instead, though, it gives you the choice of either Athletics or Piloting as a class skill, again where other comparable abilities only give you 1. It seems like a slightly more powerful version of the ability for it.

The level 6 ability Back to the Wall, feels good, and characterful, giving you a bonus when you or your starship is 0 Stamina Points or Hull Points. I do question however, HOW a ship is supposed to use this ability when it’s a 0 Hull Points, since the Core Book states that “A starship with 0 Hull Points isn’t destroyed, though many of its systems are no longer functioning and it is no longer a threat to its enemies” – So the + to damage is not very useful in that situation, though it might well be to the skill check.

Next, at level 12, we have Hardy, which gives an always useful little boost.

Finally, there is Flower that Never Wilts. Now, this ability is really nice, making you hard to kill, though I am curious as to where the name came from, but that is a sidenote, and just my inner nerd being curious.

Next, we have the Collateral Diehard an archetype for former child-slaves. Considering the topic, I would have expected this to be very, very grim, and when I read the fluff and the abilities, I cannot help but think of child soldiers, which is probably the intent here.

At level 2, we see the ability Iron Flower, which gives you a nice self-heal, which is always handy, and at level 6, we see Bloodied Frenzy, which provides a bonus against fear effects, and a damage increase when you’re at 0 Stamina Point, both of which are nice, and fit the description of the archetype quite well. Finally, at 9th level there’s Firm against the Tide, which again gives you a bonus when you’re at 0 stamina point, this time giving you temporary hit points.

Lastly there’s a section on how to include this in the Blood Space and Moon Dust setting, which gives a nice little look into the setting, but is probably not of great use to anyone outside the setting, as these cannot really be imported into your own campaign, as the information is a bit short, though they can most certainly be mined for ideas.

And so we come to the conclusion:

This is a decent (3-star), but combined with the Blood Space and Moon Dust setting, I feel like this could well be a 4, as you’d be able to, presumably, expand on the information in both setting and this book, by using the other.

In the end, I’m giving this a 4-star rating.

Well done everyone involved, this was a good read, but next time, give me a bit more to work with on its own.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Star Log.EM-003: Collateral Characters
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Everyman Minis: Brawler Archetypes
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/10/2017 09:28:53

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This Everyman Mini clocks in at 7 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2.5 pages of SRD, leaving us with 2.5 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This pdf begins with a brief introduction and then, the pdf sports two new feats: Feral Pugilism lets you use a natural attack in conjunction with abilities of Improved Unarmed Strike, specifically allowing the use of brawler’s flurry and close weapon mastery as though the natural weapon were a close weapon. This is potentially VERY potent and should have careful GM oversight, as the close weapon group restriction represents one of the problems here. Versatile Pugilism lets you choose one melee weapon, which may be a natural attack – this attack may be used in conjunction with brawler’s flurry and makes it count as a close weapon for the purpose of close weapon mastery…yeah. This lets you use two-handed swords, earthshakers, spears etc. in conjunction with brawler’s flurry. While I am sure that a lot of folks will enjoy these feats to increase the power of their characters, I don’t like them conceptually or balance-wise; they allow you to bypass what makes the brawler a brawler and the class, as such, is not necessarily in need of a power upgrade.

The pdf then proceeds with a selection of new archetypes: The brute is proficient with simple weapons and great club as well as light armor and shields (except tower shields). The archetype gains Weapon Focus (club) as a bonus feat at 1st level and applies all weapon-specific benefits for the club to the great club as well, and vice versa. At 5th level, the brute’s melee attacks with clubs ignore 1 point of DR, + 1 point at 8th level and every 3 levels thereafter. DR/- is not ignored and the benefits stack with Penetrating Strike and its Greater brother. This replaces unarmed strike and brawler’s strike. Brawler’s flurry may only be used with clubs and great clubs (strangely, referring dynamo’s flurry in a cut-copy-paste-hiccup) and 8th level modifies close weapon mastery to instead apply to clubs, using the brawler’s unarmed damage at -4 levels as a possible substitution, if it exceeds the damage of the club. See, this archetype very much makes my point regarding the feats for me – the feats are better than the archetype.

The hurling dynamo replaces proficiency with the close weapon group with thrown weapons. The dynamo’s flurry only works with unarmed strikes and thrown weapons, but both may be used within a flurry, with ranged weapon attacks counting as benefiting from Quick Draw while flurrying. Okay, so do the benefits of the modified brawler’s flurry stack with Rapid Shot? 2nd level locks the character into Precise Shot as a bonus feat. Instead of maneuver training, 3rd level yields either Ranged Feint or the option to use a chosen combat maneuver within one range increment, maximum 30 ft., using Dex-modifier to calculate CMB. This is penalized, though. The first attack of a flurry may be replaced with a maneuver or action chosen with this ability (nice catch re feinting!) and 7th level and every 4 levels thereafter yield another maneuver choice. 5th level modifies the close weapon group mastery to instead work, at -4 levels, based on brawler unarmed damage, provided that damage would exceed that of the weapon.

The kiai master replaces maneuver training with menacing shout at 3rd level, whenever the character hits at least once in a brawler’s flurry, she can make a demoralize attempt against a target thus hit as a swift action. 7th level and every 4 levels thereafter increase the number of affected targets by 1. This cap is weird, considering that the base ability does NOT have a cap of a maximum of 1 target affected at a given time, though the scaling implies just that. Starting at 4th level, the demoralize attempt, if successful, causes 1d6 sonic damage, but a given foe can only take this damage once per round. 10th level adds deafened to the target for 1 round, and 16th level increases the damage to 2d6 and increases the deafened condition to 1d4 rounds. This replaces knockout.

Finally, there would be the style savant, who only gains the benefits of style feats and combat feats based on style feats when using martial flexibility – the style savant can ignore the feat’s respective prerequisite, excluding Elemental Fist. Yep, this allows you to directly skip ahead to the final feat in a style chain. That is problematic, as the ignoring of prerequisites contradicts the central limitation of martial flexibility and prevents the viable reference to the default ability to clear the rules-language. Also from an action economy perspective – can the respective later feats building on a Style feat only be used when entering that style, which RAW, the archetype can’t? This is weird. At 1st level, the style savant treats his brawler level as fighter or monk levels for prerequisite purposes and also as the number of skill ranks in all skills for the purpose of qualifying for style feats or feats that list one or style feats among the prerequisites, replacing martial training. Maneuver training is replaced by two abilities – savant’s style, which lets the character mix two styles known into a more flexible style, allowing the character to be in two styles at once – cool: The action economy here is concise and at 19th level, the character can be in 3 different styles at once. At 7th level, the style savant may use martial flexibility as a move action to enter all allowed stances, which improves to 15th level as a swift action. So, what are “All allowed stances”? All style feats she can enter at once via style savant? What if they exceed the limit? I get what this is supposed to do, namely let the style savant enter multiple styles from her list at once, but the verbiage is a bit wonky here.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting, on a formal level, are very good. On a rules-language level, there are some oversights in the details to be found here, alas. Layout adheres to Everyman gaming’s two-column standard with a b/w-background and a nice full-color artwork. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Sasha Hall’s brawler options have in common that they seek to generate new choices and engine tweaks for the brawler class, which is generally something I applaud. However, at the same time, the options presented herein are problematic from a balance point of view and also feature some rough edges – not in their basics, but in the deeper interactions of the rules-language, which renders them RAW less precise and refined than what I’ve come to expect. As a whole, I would not allow this pdf as written at my table; the feats are straight power upgrades that invalidate one of the archetypes completely and the others also feature some potential stumbling stones. Don’t get me wrong, this is not a bad file, but it is a long way from something I’d be able to recommend. My final verdict will hence clock in at 2.5 stars, rounded down for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Brawler Archetypes
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Everyman Minis: Mysteries of Spring
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/03/2017 04:23:55

An Endzietgeist.com review

This Everyman Mini clocks in at 9 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page advertisement, 4 pages of SRD, leaving us with 2 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

All righty! As always, we begin this Everyman mini with a brief introduction and on the same page, we can find the Verdant Spell feat, which is a metamagic feat that increases the spell slot used by 2 levels and makes the targeted plant creatures susceptible to mind-affecting effects.

After this, we move on to the main meat of the mini, which would be the spring mystery. This one nets Handle Animal, Heal, Knowledge (nature) and Survival as class skills. The bonus spells granted range from goodberry over grove of respite to control plants. But what do the revelations offer? Well, animate plants lets you animate branches as a standard action, duplicating arboreal hammer, with high levels instead providing the ability to animate trees as treants (nice catch: Sans the animate trees ability of treants). Some of the revelations are drawn from the nature mystery, like spirit of nature or friend to the animals – sans taking up wordcount, mind you.

We can also find the option to clad the character in a scaling plant armor enhancement. Really cool: rejuvenation lets you render the target a Child or Youth (as per Childhood Adventures), though you do not explicitly need that book for the revelation to work properly – a mechanic effect is provided, including means to detect the target. Renewal represents a serious upgrade to the potency of the Heal skill’s treat deadly wounds option (Nice!) and yes, the obligatory speak with plants and verdant shape SP can be found as well. I was particularly smitten with springtime respite, which infuses an area with sustaining life, providing food and, at later levels, daylight (alas, not properly italicized) and a save bonus versus death effects, negative energy, etc. as well as sunbeams versus undead entering it. Cool! The final revelation ios pretty hardcore – it provides immunity versus ability damage and drain, exhaustion, etc., 3/day animal/plant growth (not properly italicized) and when you die, you rapidly decompose – only to come back to life as a plant blooms, bears fruit and spits out a young version of yourself that rapidly grows to full age. There’s an interesting adventure angle here – defend the returning oracle!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good on a formal and rules-language level, though I did notice some italicization glitches. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming’s two-column standard with a white background, making this relatively printer-friendly. The pdf sports a nice full-color artwork and has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Margherita Tramontano’s spring mystery represents a thematically-concise, interesting option. The mystery features some unique revelations, has a concise leitmotif and some really cool visuals. In short: Not much to complain about. At the same time, I don’t consider the pdf to be perfect in all regards – there are some really cool revelations here, though, which makes my final verdict clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Mysteries of Spring
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Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
by Jeff C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/01/2017 03:43:04

Since the tender age of ten, I've been in love with RPG's. I learned the fine art of writing for professional publications as a starry-eyed college student. I've taken more writing classes as a journalism major than I care to remember, plus all the English, history and creative writing I could pack in on top of gaming.

This book takes all that great technical advice from any given print journalism or English class and rolls it into one concise document for RPG writers. It also catches a lot of practical mistakes that many of us have had to learn the hard way. (i.e. getting barked at by our editor or boss.) I can't recommend this book enough.

Please, if you are considering writing anything for a game company, self publishing any game content, or even starting your own game company- Do yourself, your fans, and potential customers a huge favor and read this book! Follow this advice as much as you reasonably can and you won't go wrong.

Also, I wanted to give a big shout out to the examples in this book. Not only are they perfect for illustrating the points being made, but they're extremely amusing. I must find a way to use Tum Tum the marshmallow elemental somewhere in a game, just not anything I intend to publish. Lots of love for the T$R mage word replacement anecdote, too.

Keep up the good work!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
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