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Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition $19.99
Average Rating:4.6 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
67 16
4 8
2 2
2 3
2 1
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
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Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/24/2016 14:01:03

I feel kind of bad,for giving this book a bad review and i do not want to sound like ranting,but i also want to be honest about what bothered me with this product.First of all,the rules are nice and do some necessary revision (Vampire have lowlight vision and sharper senses on default,Disciplines are now useful on lower Level,humanity loss does not make you insane but gives you vampiric banes ......and much more good stuff). So why do I not like it?Because of the Style and the quality of the Fiction. The Fiction in this book is just dull and uninspired.Compare it with (for example) the excellent Clanbooks or requiem for rome.Those books where dark and interesting with lots of immersive Background.Sure....it is kind of unfair to compare splatbooks to Corerules,but even the WoD2 corebook,was superior in this department. The other thing which bothers me,is the constant switching between He/she when reffering to the player/a vampire.Is this supposed to be progressive? (honest question),because it would fit in the picture.The World of darkness was always very diverse and its bloodsucking ,murderous Vampires came from all kind of Backgrounds,had all kinds of sexual prefferences,Belives ,etnicitys....(you see what i mean).This book,is the first Requiem book i read ,which seems to make a fuss about it and beeing overly PC.When you look at the artwork (which is nit pretty imho) you see basicly a mixture of vaguely erotic Art and fight scenes.While the vaguely erotic scenes only in 1 (or maybe 2 scenes.....not sure about the bathroom picture) featuring people of opposite sex,the fightscenes are mostly exclusevly women beating up man. This is neither progressive nor empowering ,but just catering to a special Audience. The generel writing is cheesy & pretentios and does not create any mood or makes me want to play in this world. one Star fore the crunch,another for the ammount of material ,no star for the Fluff.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Caleb H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/01/2015 22:47:52

In 2004, game tables were introduced to the magnificent series of the new world of darkness. The core book “world of darkness” was a brilliant masterpiece of tabletop engineering. Shortly thereafter White Wolf released their flagship template book Vampire: Requiem. Like the core World of Darkness book, Vampire Requiem proved to be a true masterpiece. The writers and creators of these 2004 edition books successfully integrated easy to use narrative style mechanics with accessible, fast rules for new players and veterans alike. The company, White Wolf was ahead of the game in the narrative style RPG’s that are so popular in today’s market. Unfortunately, vampire the Requiem second edition falls flat on its face in comparison to its predecessor.

There is a lot I can say about this new edition and my hopes are that I do not ramble too much in explaining why I’m giving such a low review. The 2004 editions of WoD and the subsequent template books are by far my favorite RPG’s. I’ve been gaming for nearly 20 years and played virtually every type of RPG on the market and very few measure up to this books predecessors. That is why it saddens me so much to give a low review for this book. So let’s get started. I have a lot to say about the artwork choices of this book but I will save that until the end of my review. I’m also aware that many people may disagree with my review and it is important they keep in mind that this is my opinion my opinion alone. Also, It is late so please don't mind some of the spelling issues. Unlike most other world of darkness books, vampire 2nd jumps right in to the clans and clan descriptions. Very little has changed in this section but the writer spends a lot of time trying to fluff up the clans into being more interesting. In many ways, I do not feel like it works here. Each clan gets somewhat of a disjointed conversational description in order to build “mood” as well as spotty origins that the storyteller can pick and choose for his/her campaign. With the exception of the Nosferatu, each clan got a new Clan Bane (clan weakness). I will admit that the clan weaknesses were not the best in the 2004 edition. However, I feel like they’re pretty uninteresting in this edition as well. If anything, they become a little overcomplicated. I did notice that the Daeva had their nicknames changed from succubus to serpents. As you’ll read about later, this was done for political correctness reasons.

For a second edition book, I was really hoping onyx path would take a little more of a risk here and perhaps add in one or two new clans for this update. There were many great clans from the masquerade era that could have easily been brought back here and they chose not to. Sticking with the five clans I felt was a mistake this time around.

The next section are covenants. In my opinion, covenants were something that really needed to be re-examined for any new edition. In the 2004 edition, covenants were easy to understand but quite frankly, they were not as interesting as the politics of the original game vampire the masquerade. They always seemed a little anemic and underwhelming. In this edition, Like the clans, the covenants have a short story to introduce the reader to them followed with quick background, history and overview of each covenant. To be perfectly honest, I felt the 2004 vampire did a better job of describing the covenants. For example, The Invictus come off more as mafia type thugs then in ancient noble hierarchy. Many of the clans including The Invictus seem less interesting this time around which is strangely peculiar. We also see the loss of one of my favorite covenants Belial’s Brood. Why this covenant was removed? I honestly do not know. It is very disappointing. Jumping to chapter 3, the character creation section, we are introduced to the new rules and experience system for the God machine (world of darkness second edition) and vampire Requiem second edition. This is where things start getting a little bit clunky. Unlike the previous edition which was more or less a template book, onyx path decided to go back to the old world of darkness “all encompass” book style. It makes for this book to be rather bloated. You still may need the God machine in order to run this game as well as the world of darkness rules. However you no longer need to build a human then make a vampire. I personally feel how they did it for vampire second edition is shortsighted and significantly less flavorful than first edition. The template system seemed far more fun.

They’ve also included this absolutely awful new experience system of beats. Now players and storytellers have to keep track of beats that get converted into experience points that can be spent on attributes, merits, skills, disciplines etc. This is all an attempt to try to force role play and instead, it bogs down the game tremendously! It’s as if the creators of this game tried to grab any idea they could from other narrative games with the hopes that it would make their game better. The end result is that the XP system becomes more of a headache that can be easily manipulated and argued over. With the change to the experience distribution, the authors chose to change experience costs to lower numbers and removed experience escalation for their new linear model. In other words the first dot of an attribute costs 4 experience and the fifth dot of an attribute costs 4 experience. What my players and I discovered is that the new system allows the players to power game a little bit easier than they could before. Every scene becomes about trying to get a beat. I hope you enjoy bookkeeping.

The next thing that really bothered me about this edition was the reimagining of merits. Merits have gone from humanlike abilities that enriched your character to now looking like Dungeons & Dragons feats of awesomeness. One minute onyx path is trying to convince us that this is a storyteller game and the next, they’re trying to make it more action-packed and combat heavy. The merits read more like devotions or superpowers than I believe they ever were intended to. Do you want your claws to do aggravated damage? It’s a merit. Want to see in the dark? It’s a merit. Etc. etc. In this section we also see a change to the disciplines. The changes for the most part are not bad here. However, most of the changes require you to look up the condition it puts on somebody under the condition section in the back of the book. Similar to the experience system, the introduction of tilts and conditions is an absolute cluster to the flow of game. This is also an attempt to have you buy the condition cards sold here on drivethruRPG. In other words, if you use your mesmerize ability, a player gains a mesmerized condition which they have to follow. However, they can get a beat for having the power used on them if they overcome the condition… fun…

I’m going to go ahead and skip a lot here. There is a chapter on combat, rolling dice, what attributes are etc. the next section I want to get to his chapter 5 which is the introduction of the villains in the new Requiem second edition. And that is the Strix. If you have ever played or read Requiem for Rome you know who these antagonists are. In truth, they were never interesting when they were introduced and they are really bad here. I do agree that there needed to be some more antagonists introduced in vampire and I think the brood would have served as a much better villain type. The Strix feels very contrived and bogeyman like. They really don’t make a lot of sense and I can see a lot of people completely ignoring this chapter. Again, they could have removed nearly 40 pages right here and you would not miss it.

The next chapter focuses on other covenants and vampires around the world and for the most part, this was pretty interesting. I can see a lot more been written regarding this subject matter. If you decide to pick up the PDF of this book, this would not be a bad chapter to peruse.

There are a few more chapters regarding storytelling and The Living, in which it concludes with the long endless list of conditions. In truth, I could talk a lot more about this book. There’s a very good chance that you already know whether or not you’re going to buy this book, regardless of my review. I do know that a lot of people are reviewing highly of this edition (and the God machine book) and I believe more out of loyalty than out of substance. This book was created by committee on the onyx path forum and quite frankly you can tell. There’s a lot of ideas that were thrown in here and in many ways it seems to be lacking the same level of confidence that the first edition book had. It feels like this edition is trying to wear many hats ranging from being a storyteller narrative game to a combat game. The end result is that it does not succeed the same way the 2004 edition did.

I’m sure you’re getting excited about coming to the end of the review as I’m getting excited about ending the review. However, I really need to talk about the artwork. I do not want this to get political and everyone will have their own opinion but the artwork in this book is not only bad, but it reeks of political agenda. There is approximately 47 pictures in this book. There are approximately 5 pictures that show inanimate objects (a car, buildings, heads etc.). So far, no big deal. Except, there is unquestionably a gender bias of female superiority and an anti-male sentiment throughout the entire book. There are 21 pictures that depict women as authority figures over men and only about 2 pictures that depict a male with confidence or authority one of which is a man giving another man a good time in the shower (p.93). Men are consistently depicted as weak, victims, or servants. When a man does get a picture it is usually to depict pain or anguish (P.102). The artwork constantly depicts women as powerful (P. 111), (P. 279), confident (P. 274), (P. 33), (P. 36) (P. 39) or unstoppable (P. 54). Men on the other hand are only there to be bloody messes or aloof. Even most of the men’s clothing in the book shows a lack of organization or confidence. (Don’t think it’s sexist art? Reverse all of the female characters into male character in your head and ask if it is not sexiest).

Another major issue is the emphasis within the text that vampires are sexual and sexual beings while almost all of the artwork shows rather conservative looking characters. To be honest, this is probably the least sexual depiction of vampires I’ve ever witnessed. I’m not sure when exactly the creative team behind this product became so terrified of sexuality in art but it clearly shows in this book. And most importantly, the extreme pro-woman anti-male artwork honestly does subtract from the content. Once you see it, you can’t un-see it. Even the picture of the Daeva which is supposed to be the pinnacle of sexuality shows a rather benign looking vampire that doesn’t exude any confidence or charisma under the clan section.

In conclusion, Vampire the Requiem second edition is more Buffy the vampire slayer then say The Lost Boys or Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Both in flavor and in game mechanics, second edition seems like an identity crisis. It doesn’t know if it wants to be more storyteller orientated like its predecessor or if it wants to corner the market on crunch and combat. With the inclusion of conditions, combat becomes very much about who goes first, who can break someone’s arm, who can put the first power/condition on etc. I believe it could even be argued that in this addition it would not be unwise to have a combat mat which I’ve never said before regarding world of darkness products. It attempts to force role-play with a half thought out beat system for experience points and it tries very hard to force mood.

In the past 10 years, I have gotten many people interested into world of darkness. However, I really cannot endorse the new second edition WoD model. And though it goes without saying, I know many players and gaming groups who wholeheartedly agree with this review. Not only do they agree with the issues of mechanics but also regarding the appalling art. It took me a long time to write this review and it does sadden me but I hope that the game developers do take my suggestions to heart. Quite frankly, I am waiting for the world of darkness second edition revised and vampire the Requiem second edition revised books. Maybe then we will get a good product. Hopefully one without agenda.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by shawn h. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/04/2015 14:40:42

layout and design is nice. unfortunately I'm withholding a mark due to the fact that, as usual, the HC version shipped physically damaged.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Christopher H. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/20/2015 19:07:58

You can listen to my review of this book on Darker Days Radio http://podcast.darker-days.org/e/darker-days-radio-episode-56/



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by manuel h. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/18/2015 12:13:44

Great book! I have been playing V:tM and 1st edition V:tR for quite long times and now I really like the direction, where this new edition is heading. Many rules were completely rewritten, and in most cases, I prefer the new rules. Those few passages, where I liked the old rules more (like sun light) are very easy to fix. The new disciplines are awesome, and contribute much to a dense mood. I also like the clan descriptions and the many examples for touchstones, feeding grounds etc. Touchstones, by the way, are a great innovation, it's mostly persons remembering you of your humanity. Both the style of writing in this book and the rules strongly support the mood a vampire game should have.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Alexander P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/15/2015 19:54:19

Vampire: the Requiem was a game with an identity problem.

As the first title in the New World of Darkness, Requiem had big shoes to fill; it failed to distinguish itself from its prestigious predecessor (Vampire: the Masquerade), and ended up rather bland. While later supplements bolstered the line, the core meat of it remained somewhat unsatisfying.

Requiem 2e goes a long way towards fixing that. This second edition (previous Blood & Smoke: The Strix Chronicle) is a game that oozes style; the fiction is evocative, the mechanics are a hell of a lot more elegant, and the sample settings within give new Storytellers a sound chance to step right into the game. The rules updates are welcome in a lot of places (updated experience point costs, revised Disciplines, an overhauled Humanity system that I'm just in love with) and slightly clunky in others (Conditions, Beats, and Touchstones all generally go ignored by my playgroup as unnecessary clutter), but the product as a whole is satisfying.

If you're willing to give Requiem a shot, this book might win you over. The Masquerade influence is definitely still there in places, but this is a game that can definitely stand on its own and start forging a legacy in future supplements.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Michael H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/25/2014 15:25:56

OPP has really outdone themselves here. This is a fantastic product for any World of Darkness fan, and a welcome addition to my collection. I can't wait to introduce my players to it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Harry H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/30/2014 16:21:31

A really well written, well designed game. I have gotten a few people into role-playing and world of darkness by using this.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Martin P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/21/2014 00:04:32

This is a very good book probably my new favorite and definitely the trump of the 2nd ed NWoD splats at this time (end of 2014, so there's only demon and vampire, but meh). It holds a much needed update to vampire, it is more or less self-contiained with a few minor exceptions, and it is in general a very interesting read.

Now, on the downside, here are a few things you should consider. Please note that while the below list is "long" I do not believe any of these things are so bad as to make the book itself bad, but if you are particularly bothered by any of the below you should probably think carefully before buying the book so as to avoid being disappointed later on. (and yes, I have been Very nitpicky with this part)

First off, this is not a very well ordered book. The way it's laid out is confusing, it lacks an index (but has bookmarks, a minor balm for the issue) which makes the layout issue a bit more troublesome.

It is also lacking entirely in animals, despite the fact that one of the powers, Protean, actually relies on them for shape-shifting, something which also limits your choices of Ghouls (servants) and so on. This issue CAN be gotten around by looking online for some fan-made animals of course, or just writing up a few yourself.

Then at last (and least, to my mind) we have language use. This is not an entirely "clean" book. It is not by any stretch dirty but you should, if you are particularly sensitive, keep this in mind.

At this time the book costs $19.99 and I, personally, would consider it well worth that price.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Joshua H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/06/2014 20:41:00

I have been playing Vampire since the days of Vt:M. Requiem simplified the rules to the point where my entire group couldn't imagine going back. This book, being nothing more than the Requiem the writers wished they produced from the beginning, has either simplified many rules or clarified them significantly. It includes Merits from across all books that should have been there from the beginning and turned Disciplines into diverse, yet finely tuned tools to be exploited and utilized in any story, be it horror, mystery, political play or any combination of them all. Thank you, White Wolf!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Christopher S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/15/2014 08:26:39

The game that Vampire: the Requiem should always have been.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Matt G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/22/2014 13:22:41

It's amazing how nearly all of the rule changes are my house rules. I'm thrilled by the better vampire combat system, even if I find the Strix somewhat lackluster after all the hype. It is a solid sting that balances thebest if old and new WoD. You won't be disappointed.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Garrett T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/27/2014 11:11:27

I was incredibly excited for this book to come out and incredibly disappointment once it was released.

This book feels like a Requiem 1.1 rather than a Requiem 2.0. I was disappointment in the fact that material from the supplement blood sorcery wasn't included, no bloodlines are included (and there are no plans to officially update the old bloodlines), the humanity system feels even more restrictive than before, etc.

The decisions Onyx path made to make this a "stand alone" product (yet they direct you back to God Machine for Merits?!) while making the God Machine reliant on the original World of Darkness Core seems like the most backward decision they could have made. If God Machine was a stand alone product, they could have used the extra space that opened to really flesh out this book with Vampire specific rules and lore. Now they are stuck in a cycle were every new splat will contain "core" information (which gives us less book), yet refers us back to another book that refers us back to another book.

Vampire the Requiem is ten years old and this is the first actual revision to the game, I was hoping for a solid product that incorporated and updated the rules and themes published since 2004 and in many ways this book delivers.. but not nearly enough to justify the ten years it took to get it.

-I enjoyed the new Coils and Scales of the Dragon, but somehow still miss the old ones. I wish Blood Sorcery had gotten the same treatment in the corebook. -I love many of the new merits.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Jon G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/22/2014 09:21:09

This Book Takes the Concept of "The Danse Macabre" from Vampire the Requiem and turns it into a Bleeding Fact of the game, at first I was worried that with so many changes to the NWoD would leave me with a bad taste, and Frustration as a Storyteller. But this is exactly what Requiem needed, it breathes something back into the system that left vampire's feeling lifeless. Now while the concept of playing an Inhuman Monster clinging to the last vestiges of humanity to remain a thinking creature was fun, This is Beautiful. No longer are Vampires merely creatures that are no longer human, they are something completely Inhuman merely masquerading as a part of the world. While I'm still concerned with how some of the supplements I bought for Requiem fit into the larger concept of what it is to be Kindred with this addition, Its not something I'll worry about in the long run. Beautifully done, masterfully written. Worth buying the Premium addition and the wait for its arrival.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire: The Requiem 2nd Edition
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Maxime L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/28/2014 09:27:03

An uneven book, but a much better core than the original, bland Vampire: The Requiem core. Underneath a confusing title (this should really be named Vampire: The Requiem, second edition), you will fine a refined background, an expanded system, and a focus on a specific set of antagonists (the Stryx) and campaign setting.

The book opens on the usual Introduction which is common to all White Wolf core books, with general knowledge about vampire in the game and what a RPG is. The inspirational media section drew my attention, for it is quite short and precise. It's just odd seeing a series of Vampire fiction works which doesn't include Dracula. Of note is that it does mention some other Requiem books (namely the five Clan Books, the Stryx Chronicles Anthology and Damnation City), which should give you an idea of what the authors are aligning the book with.

Chapter one opens on the first part of a fiction which runs through the book, and then opens with the Five Clans. They haven't dramatically changed, but rather refocused around their theme, and I was pleased with the result. Weaknesses (now called Clan Banes) have changed as well: the Daeva know get attached to those they feed too much from, while the Ventrue quickly grow detached from mankind. The information given here, as through the rest of the book, is very evocative, and immediately inspires stories. We are also treated to stories of some lost Clans, good fodder for stories as well.

Then follows the description of the Covenants. Here as well, there has been a lot of improvement and you get a definite feel for each of the Covenant. The Lancea Sanctum, which suffered from having been the first Covenant to receive its book in the past, felt particularly more vivid to me there. My only disappointment was VII, which is still a big mystery we're not told much about, only now vaguely tied to the Stryx. Similarly to the previous section, we get some info about some lost covenants. Interestingly, there is no mention of Belial's Brood here (possibly to avoid overlap with Stryx-possessed vampires in their antagonist role?)

The next chapter describes "the Night Society", the (un)life of a vampire from the early nights to the possible end. Here again, we get lots of concrete examples, enough to fire up the imagination. We end up with the lexicon which, THANK GOODNESS, has dropped some of the "old people slang/new people slang" which Requiem had imported from Masquerade. I'm glad I don't have to read about "Lupines" anymore.

Chapter 3 gives us the basic character creation rules of the WoD system, as updated in the God Machine Chronicle (aka nWod 2.0). The basics haven't changed much, but some new points are interesting. Vampires drop virtues and vices, and instead gain a Mask and a Dirge, what they present to the world and their true nature. A character also gets a Touchstone attached to his humanity stat - a character, or more rarely an item or location, which keeps them grounded to their human nature. The experience system is also presented, and has been reworked to key off story elements more than ever. Also interesting is that it is a linear rather than exponential system - increase Strength from 3 to 4 costs the same as increasing it from 2 to 3, which I think fits a story driven game (where we always want to see some progression happen).

We then are treated to the rules which govern undead life, some of which have changed in a way that affects the setting. The Predator's Taint is much more complex, having three different aspects. Humanity is closely tied to the Touchstones system, and also vampires now have their own specific "sins" (Finally). I really enjoyed the fact Vampires now must take Banes when decreasing in Humanity (and the Mekhet, as part of their weaknesses, are more vulnerable to them) meaning that you can have some vampires afraid of crosses and garlics, but not others. Merits have also been reworked to include many ones specific to vampires, covenants, or clans, making it much easier to customize a character with fancy abilities. Then we get Disciplines, which are still the same core ones, but have all been reworked. Almost all of them come of as being more "useful", and in particular Protean allows you to really play the shapeshifting role. We then get a much larger list of devotions than any I had seen before, once again allowing to customize a character while standing within the bounds of the main Clans and disciplines. Blood Sorcery and Theban Sorcery remain more or less the same, while the Coils of the Dragon are now on a scale of 1 to 5 - more consistant with the rest of the system, but making it harder for a Dragon to master more than 1.

We then, after being treated to pages of rules specific to vampires, find a chapter which explains the basic rules of the game - one of many questionable layout choices, which will make the book confusing for any new player. The major change here is the use of conditions, the list of which is... all the way at the end of the book. Not the most practical, again.

The next chapter covers the Stryx mentioned in the book's title (it only took 197 pages to get there!) in an extensive manner. Basic rules and a lot of sample characters provide for an extensive antagonists which will doubtlessly help readers to come up with their own ideas. The Stryx are powerful, sinister and enigmatic, a perfect foil to vampires.

The next chapter was a nice surprise, as it describes a few campaign settings based on different world locations (Athens, Beijing, Berlin, Montreal, Raleigh, Swansea, Tokyo, San Francisco). All of them have unique crises they're facing, making them a good mine for story ideas, and many have their own local covenants (some of which get some simple rules to go with it, others not). One thing that piqued my interest is the Jiang Shi, a sixth Clan of sorts with its unique bane (but no unique discipline).

Which finish on a chapter related to storytelling, which I expected to be the same bland advice we found everywhere but actually had a lot of good advice on how to use the vampire-specific system to further support the story, and ways to tweak them. It closes on an interesting "12 steps" campaign creation concept, essentially motivating the players to come up with NPC ideas and the ties between them. I'm thinking of adapting it to other games myself.

Appendix one, the living, describes some of the vampire's mortal relationships, but mainly serves as the most interesting coverage of ghouls I've ever read. Appendix 2 (finally) lists the conditions, many of which are specific to vampires or their victims.

Overall, this is a great improvement on the Requiem line. What this book is:

  • A new core book for the game
  • A strong support for one to create characters and campaigns
  • A story-axed game, with a system to support it
  • A Requiem book, moving further from Masquerade and cementing its own mythology

What it isn't:

  • A new player friendly book. The Clans ahead of the setting, the vampire rules ahead of the regular ones, the conditions at the end... this stuff is confusing.
  • A polite book. I have no issues with the c or f word in real life, but I really don't see the point of including them in a book when not in fiction.
  • A well laid out book: there is something weird and inconsistent about how the titles and columns interact, and I often have to look for where to go next.

Despite this minor flaws however, I would still recommend this book for anyone fan of vampire stories - just be prepared for a little bit of extra difficulty if you have never read anything related to Requiem, and a lot if you have never played a RPG.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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