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Road of the Dead $6.99
Average Rating:4.7 / 5
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Road of the Dead
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Road of the Dead
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/30/2012 07:16:08

This adventure is located in Raging Swan's Lonely Coast campaign setting but, as it deals with remnants of a far-distant past just about everybody has forgotten about, it can be placed in a suitable location in your own campaign world with minimal effort. Before getting into the adventure, however, there is a very clear explanation of how encounters are set out showing you exactly where to find each item of information you might need whilst running it. A lot of people lay encounters out clearly, but actually explaining your methods in advance is a nice touch. Traps and monster stat blocks are similarly laid out in detail, and this is followed by an overview of the Lonely Coast, to enable you to establish the adventure's location easily, complete with a good map.

Next comes an Adventure Background and an Adventure Synopsis. The Background gives all the detail you need about the situation, and the Synopsis walks you through the intended sequence of events. There's a note about the best way to relocate the adventure if you don't want to use the Lonely Coast, and then more detail of the complex whose exploration forms the actual adventure, complete with a beautifully-detailed map that has a 'hand-drawn' feel. Several ideas are provided for why the characters come across this adventure, including blind chance (after all, it's over ten centuries old and most folks don't even know it's there!) as well as reasons for why they might be in the area about other concerns. Neat.

The adventure proper then begins, with everything you need to run the characters through finding the entrance... complete with pictures to show your players as well as detailed plans of each location. This is well-resourced indeed! Everything is very clear and detailed, you will not need to spend time rummaging through other books to find additional information.

The adventure itself is deliberately challenging for the intended Level 3 characters, partly because they have ample time to rest, regain spells, etc., as they explore and partly because, well, it's intended to be a dangerous place anyway. But the rewards are pretty good, especially for those who like - or know where they can sell - ancient artefacts and knowledge.

It is a well-devised and beautifully-presented dungeon crawl, with a coherent underlying rationale and plenty of exploration and combat to challenge the most determined adventurers. Moreover, it is not - as so many such adventures are - very linear, the characters have quite a lot of freedom in where they go and what they do whilst exploring the depths. There's an excellent atmosphere of treading ancient halls that have not been disturbed for countless generations... and even some follow-up activities if desired.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Road of the Dead
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Sean H. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 12/03/2011 22:31:02

Superb layout and support transforms a basic genre scenario into a strong and easy to use adventure. Raging Swan has done excellent work with Road of the Dead.

Road of the Dead: A Pathfinder Roleplaying Game adventure for 3rd level PCs is a 51-page PDF (47-pages if you remove the covers and OGL page) written by Creighton Broadhurst and published by Raging Swan Press. This is part of Raging Swan’s Lonely Coast setting but it is designed to be easily adaptable to other settings.

The layout is a standard page with two columns in a smallish font, which can occasionally be difficult to read but packs in a lot of information. The interior art is sparse but good and there are a set of nine player’s handouts illustrating either the physical layout of the adventure (art and map section) or the two magic items found. Six pre-generated characters are also included.

The adventure is very well laid out with explanations of the encounter, trap and creature blocks that are used in this product. The adventure is a strait forward exploration of a monument of a forgotten race scenario, but a superb version of the well-used trope. Each encounter area has its own players’ handout with both art and a map of the area on it, quite brilliant. The locations are interesting and the combats challenging. Suggestions for further adventure (and two encounters for them) are included.

Beyond the adventure itself there are three new monsters (all demons), a new disease, a new weapon and two new magic items, all of which will be encountered in the adventure, naturally.

Disclosure: As a featured reviewer for RPGNow/DriveThroughRPG, I received my copy of this product for free from the publisher for the purpose of this review.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Road of the Dead
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Dark M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/16/2011 17:05:53

Road of the Dead by Raging Swan Publishing

This product is 51 pages long. It starts with a cover, ToC, and credits. (5 pages)

Using the Adventure (5 pages) It starts off with explaining stat blocks, talks about encounters, traps, treasures, and a overview of the Lonely Coast area, with map. It ends with a adventure overview and summery.

Road of the Dead (18 pages) The Road of the Dead is a old religious location. It starts with a map, random encounters, features about the road and plot hooks. There is 6 encounters and two optional encounters. There is some lore checks to learn about the Road of the Dead, a bit of a Indian Jones style romp with monsters in a old religious place is the over all feel of things.

Appendix 1: New Stuff (4 pages) There is 3 new monsters, 1 new disease, 2 new magic items and a new weapon.

Appendix 2: Player's Handouts(10 pages) All told there is 17 varies player handouts in this section, some are two to a page.

Appendix 3: Pregen PC's (7 pages) There is 6 pregen characters in this section, with full stat blocks but no histories.

It ends with a OGL and back cover. (2 pages)

Closing thoughts. The art work is black and white and ranges from ok to very good. Editing and layout was good, I didn't notice any errors or problems. This adventure is a more standard explore the lost “insert name here” type dungeon, but there is some knowledge and lore aspects to it. Otherwise it is a fairly well done short dungeon crawl. While it is made to fit into the local area of the Lonely Coast area by Raging Swan it would be pretty easy to drop in just about anywhere for PC's as a side trek. It is made for a 3rd level party, it does have some information about continuing the adventure as well as scaling it for other levels. So what's my rating? It is a nice simple very well done fun little dungeon crawl. It just begs to have had more lore and puzzles and such added to it. I am going to rate this one a 4.5, good but with just a bit more it could have been great.

Trust me, I'm a Succubus.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Road of the Dead
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/24/2010 14:04:58

Road of the Dead

Disclaimer:

I got this adventure for free for the purpose of this review.

Raging Swan Press has managed to publish one of my favorite 1st level adventures of all time with their very first release, Retribution. Road of the Dead is the new adventure by Raging Swan and thus, my expectations are sky-high and very hard to meet. While Retribution was EXTREMELY friendly on the DM and tried its best to make the adventure easy to run, Road of the Dead is the first adventure in Raging Swan's Go Play-series. The aim of the series is, as far as I've understood it, to make adventures the DM can pick up one hour before any given session, read through and run. A lofty goal indeed and I'll try to make my review taking both my own standards and this ambition into account. That being said, let's dive right into the review!

The pdf is 51 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 blank page on the inside of the front cover, 2 pages credits, 1 page table of contents, 1 page OGL, 1 page back cover and an accompanying blank page on the inside of the back cover. That leaves 43 pages of gaming content.

The module kicks off with 2 pages of explanation of how to read the stat-blocks to help novice DMs and 2 pages introducing The Lonely Coast, Raging Swan's free mini-setting, which, if you haven't already, you should check out. For ease of reference, we get both a player-friendly map (1 page) of the area and a table including how long travels to specific locations take with different base speeds. An awesome idea that helps run the area and, if you're like me, will appreciate. I hate calculating distances and overland traveling times. Thanks for not making me do it in this adventure. In stark contrast to the multitude of different genres we had blended together in Retribution, Road of the Dead is a straight dungeon crawl spanning 18 pages. “Straightforward” might, however, not be the correct moniker for the dungeon the PCs are about to explore. Many of the encounters can be solved via more than one way, depending on the skills of the PCs. Only one kind of character won't have too much to do: If you happen to have a social skill monkey/ diplomatic character, you won't have too much for this character to do.

“So”, you're asking, “Endzeitgeist, what makes this adventure special or stand out? What about its atmosphere?” All right, I'm going into minor spoilers there, so potential players, please skip to the next paragraph. The basic idea is somewhat reminiscent of Aztec/Maya myths of a physical road to the underworld, adapted to a fantasy setting. 3rd level and PCs treading the road to the underworld? Yep, however, the dungeon is only modeled after the real road (or what the architects deemed the road to look like) and thus works.

Mechanically, the dungeon is interesting due to several factors that can be ultimately be summed up in one word: Clever. Almost every encounter features interesting environmental factors influencing the combat and rewards PCs for fighting clever and makes good use of these factors. In stark contrast to almost all “Pick-up-and-play”-modules I've read so far, this makes for complex and challenging encounters. And no, the DM is not forced to skip through the rules all the time to look them up: They are all summed up in the respective encounter and feature even tables summing up the modifications of e.g. fighting in the water. The finale is lethal and PCs should have learned to fight intelligently at this point.

With regards to the atmosphere, I'm kind of torn. On the one hand, the adventure can work awesome and build significant tension, if pulled off right by an experienced DM. On the other hand, most of the potential tension comes from encountering stuff like a bone portcullis, red water and the like, i.e. the "blunt force approach". While I personally like and can pull off romps like that, I can see the atmosphere becoming cheesy if the DM does not take care or one of the players starts picking on it. In e.g. direct comparison to Retribution, there is no psychological component or particular involvement on the player's part. Granted, that's not necessary for a dungeon crawl, but it would have been the icing on the cake.

The adventure closes with two optional encounters each taking up a page, one as a complication/sequel/follow-up to the final battle (at least for sadistic DMs like me) and the second one a fairly straight follow-up encounter/interlude.

After that, we get the first appendix, new stuff (4 pages): 3 new demons (all CR 3, nothing to really write home about), 1 new disease, 2 new magic items and a new exotic double-weapon.

One of the best parts of the adventure, though, is the second appendix (10 pages), which contains player's handouts. Several key locations have their very own artwork you can show your players along a part of the map for strategic position and in case they don't get the layout of an area from your description. That's right. Player friendly maps you don't have to cut from your DM-map AND artworks. And yes, no secret compartments on the player maps. Very, very nice. This should be standard in the industry. The 2 new magic items also get their own pictures in this section, so you can easily hand them and their stats over to the players.

The third appendix contains 6 pre-generated PCs. (7 pages)

General features: The editing and formatting is top-notch, the artwork is b/w and, while not absolutely gorgeous, beautiful in its own way. Due to the many artworks in player handouts and their quality, I'd say you get a lot of good art for your money. The writing helps you evoke suspense and the complex encounters can easily be run without having any other book at hand or skipping through the module.

Conclusion: This is a hard one for me. If you'd ask me, which module was superior, I'd immediately, without thinking, reply: Retribution! And then go on to rant why it's so great. However, Road of the Dead does not try to be a sequel and it mostly succeeds at what it does. It's an atmospheric, cool dungeon crawl with an iconic location, clever encounters and intelligently designed environmental hazards. Has it succeeded at its premise, i.e. being a “Pick up & play”-module, with minimum preparation time? Actually yes, it did. I DMed the adventure and only read it an hour before running it and it worked, despite all the environmental factors. For DMs with limited time on their hands, this is a real boon and testament to clever organization and formatting. It was fun, too. Nice. I've played PFS-scenarios that needed MUCH more tweaking and preparation.

However, being the nit-picker that I am, I also have some criticism: Road of the Dead lacks the spark of genius I so enjoyed in Retribution. Even if you don't take into account the genre of the adventure (straight crawl vs. wilderness/mystery/crawl), I felt like something was missing and, after careful consideration, managed to pin it down: Social interaction. The most suspenseful encounters in Retribution included talking to enemies and overcoming them via skill-challenges/role-playing and the like. In the case of Road of the Dead, your PCs won't have an encounter like that. I don't know whether my group is an aberration, but our diplomat (i.e. social monkey) didn't have too much to do in this adventure and one or two encounters like that would have deepened the immersion of the players. I realize that this criticism may be a bit unfair, as this is supposed to be a traditional crawl. Keep in mind that this is criticism on the highest level.

My final verdict is 4.5 stars. If you're looking for a nice, crunchy crawl that is easy to run, add half a star. If you are one of those guys who want their PCs to talk and negotiate with just about everything, subtract half a star. If you're busy and in need of a good module to pick up and play, be sure to pick Road of the Dead up – the artwork as well as the DM-friendliness is worth your money.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Road of the Dead
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Thilo G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/24/2010 14:04:58

Road of the Dead

Disclaimer:

I got this adventure for free for the purpose of this review.

Raging Swan Press has managed to publish one of my favorite 1st level adventures of all time with their very first release, Retribution. Road of the Dead is the new adventure by Raging Swan and thus, my expectations are sky-high and very hard to meet. While Retribution was EXTREMELY friendly on the DM and tried its best to make the adventure easy to run, Road of the Dead is the first adventure in Raging Swan's Go Play-series. The aim of the series is, as far as I've understood it, to make adventures the DM can pick up one hour before any given session, read through and run. A lofty goal indeed and I'll try to make my review taking both my own standards and this ambition into account. That being said, let's dive right into the review!

The pdf is 51 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 blank page on the inside of the front cover, 2 pages credits, 1 page table of contents, 1 page OGL, 1 page back cover and an accompanying blank page on the inside of the back cover. That leaves 43 pages of gaming content.

The module kicks off with 2 pages of explanation of how to read the stat-blocks to help novice DMs and 2 pages introducing The Lonely Coast, Raging Swan's free mini-setting, which, if you haven't already, you should check out. For ease of reference, we get both a player-friendly map (1 page) of the area and a table including how long travels to specific locations take with different base speeds. An awesome idea that helps run the area and, if you're like me, will appreciate. I hate calculating distances and overland traveling times. Thanks for not making me do it in this adventure. In stark contrast to the multitude of different genres we had blended together in Retribution, Road of the Dead is a straight dungeon crawl spanning 18 pages. “Straightforward” might, however, not be the correct moniker for the dungeon the PCs are about to explore. Many of the encounters can be solved via more than one way, depending on the skills of the PCs. Only one kind of character won't have too much to do: If you happen to have a social skill monkey/ diplomatic character, you won't have too much for this character to do.

“So”, you're asking, “Endzeitgeist, what makes this adventure special or stand out? What about its atmosphere?” All right, I'm going into minor spoilers there, so potential players, please skip to the next paragraph. The basic idea is somewhat reminiscent of Aztec/Maya myths of a physical road to the underworld, adapted to a fantasy setting. 3rd level and PCs treading the road to the underworld? Yep, however, the dungeon is only modeled after the real road (or what the architects deemed the road to look like) and thus works.

Mechanically, the dungeon is interesting due to several factors that can be ultimately be summed up in one word: Clever. Almost every encounter features interesting environmental factors influencing the combat and rewards PCs for fighting clever and makes good use of these factors. In stark contrast to almost all “Pick-up-and-play”-modules I've read so far, this makes for complex and challenging encounters. And no, the DM is not forced to skip through the rules all the time to look them up: They are all summed up in the respective encounter and feature even tables summing up the modifications of e.g. fighting in the water. The finale is lethal and PCs should have learned to fight intelligently at this point.

With regards to the atmosphere, I'm kind of torn. On the one hand, the adventure can work awesome and build significant tension, if pulled off right by an experienced DM. On the other hand, most of the potential tension comes from encountering stuff like a bone portcullis, red water and the like, i.e. the "blunt force approach". While I personally like and can pull off romps like that, I can see the atmosphere becoming cheesy if the DM does not take care or one of the players starts picking on it. In e.g. direct comparison to Retribution, there is no psychological component or particular involvement on the player's part. Granted, that's not necessary for a dungeon crawl, but it would have been the icing on the cake.

The adventure closes with two optional encounters each taking up a page, one as a complication/sequel/follow-up to the final battle (at least for sadistic DMs like me) and the second one a fairly straight follow-up encounter/interlude.

After that, we get the first appendix, new stuff (4 pages): 3 new demons (all CR 3, nothing to really write home about), 1 new disease, 2 new magic items and a new exotic double-weapon.

One of the best parts of the adventure, though, is the second appendix (10 pages), which contains player's handouts. Several key locations have their very own artwork you can show your players along a part of the map for strategic position and in case they don't get the layout of an area from your description. That's right. Player friendly maps you don't have to cut from your DM-map AND artworks. And yes, no secret compartments on the player maps. Very, very nice. This should be standard in the industry. The 2 new magic items also get their own pictures in this section, so you can easily hand them and their stats over to the players.

The third appendix contains 6 pre-generated PCs. (7 pages)

General features: The editing and formatting is top-notch, the artwork is b/w and, while not absolutely gorgeous, beautiful in its own way. Due to the many artworks in player handouts and their quality, I'd say you get a lot of good art for your money. The writing helps you evoke suspense and the complex encounters can easily be run without having any other book at hand or skipping through the module.

Conclusion: This is a hard one for me. If you'd ask me, which module was superior, I'd immediately, without thinking, reply: Retribution! And then go on to rant why it's so great. However, Road of the Dead does not try to be a sequel and it mostly succeeds at what it does. It's an atmospheric, cool dungeon crawl with an iconic location, clever encounters and intelligently designed environmental hazards. Has it succeeded at its premise, i.e. being a “Pick up & play”-module, with minimum preparation time? Actually yes, it did. I DMed the adventure and only read it an hour before running it and it worked, despite all the environmental factors. For DMs with limited time on their hands, this is a real boon and testament to clever organization and formatting. It was fun, too. Nice. I've played PFS-scenarios that needed MUCH more tweaking and preparation.

However, being the nit-picker that I am, I also have some criticism: Road of the Dead lacks the spark of genius I so enjoyed in Retribution. Even if you don't take into account the genre of the adventure (straight crawl vs. wilderness/mystery/crawl), I felt like something was missing and, after careful consideration, managed to pin it down: Social interaction. The most suspenseful encounters in Retribution included talking to enemies and overcoming them via skill-challenges/role-playing and the like. In the case of Road of the Dead, your PCs won't have an encounter like that. I don't know whether my group is an aberration, but our diplomat (i.e. social monkey) didn't have too much to do in this adventure and one or two encounters like that would have deepened the immersion of the players. I realize that this criticism may be a bit unfair, as this is supposed to be a traditional crawl. Keep in mind that this is criticism on the highest level.

My final verdict is 4.5 stars. If you're looking for a nice, crunchy crawl that is easy to run, add half a star. If you are one of those guys who want their PCs to talk and negotiate with just about everything, subtract half a star. If you're busy and in need of a good module to pick up and play, be sure to pick Road of the Dead up – the artwork as well as the DM-friendliness is worth your money.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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