Flames Rising PDF Store
DriveThruComics
DriveThruFiction



Home » Dreamscarred Press » Psionics Expanded: Unlimited Possibilities » Reviews
Close
Close
 Quick Find
Browse
 Follow Your Favorites!
NotificationsSign in to get custom notifications of new products!
 Information
See our Quickstart Guide for information on how to get started.

Having Problems?
  • Troubleshooting - go here if you are having technical problems with the site or your products.
  • FAQ - our Frequently Asked Questions page.
  • Device Help - assistance for viewing your purchases on a tablet device.
  • Contact us if none of these answer your questions.

Affiliate System - Click here for information about how you can get money by referring people to Flames Rising PDF Store!

Our Latest Newsletter
Product Reviews
Privacy Policy
How to Sell on Flames Rising PDF Store
Convention Support Program


RSS Feed New Product RSS Feed
Back
Other comments left by this customer:
Path of Villains
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/24/2015 04:46:28
An Endzeitgeist.com review

The second book in Legendary Games' Mythic Paths-series clocks in at 28 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 3 pages of how-to-use/introduction, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 18 pages of content, so let us take a look, shall we?



So, a good villain - every DM knows that the opposition is just as important as the heroes - and personally, my love for them can probably be attributed to reading too many great stories as a child: Batman is cool, but the Joker? He's just awesome. Superman? Nice, but Lex Luthor is damn impressive as well...what's Spidey sans Venom or Doc Oc? Yeah, so what we have here would be a handy assortment of guidelines for DMs to help ensure that their villains are just like that - memorable.



Now unlike what you'd expect, we essentially get a so-called villain path - which is essentially a virtual path that can just be used to supplement the usual path of your villains - i.e., yes, any mythic villain can scavenge these, even if s/he/it already has the Dual Path ability. However, it *is*treated as a path for the purposes of path-modifying feats. Got that? Now here's the cincher - there is a different suggested table for villains with mythic tiers and one for villains with mythic ranks -and yes, handily internally linked lists of abilities by tier are provided - one click and the pdf jumps to the ability - extremely comfortable to use! As a note for designers - while it's not as important for homebrew DMs (though they'll appreciate it) - each ability also sports the place and format for the statblock! Nice, since it maintains consistency!



Know those times when you are tempted to fudge the dice? When a player's lucky crit kills off your BBEG when it shouldn't? Well, what about reflexive revival? Not enough? What about returning from the grave a day after being slain? Yes, these are damn cool abilities! Not enough? What about revival as a vampire, revenant or similar, dead and nasty creature? Reflexive fast healing, mythic power-theft, storing mythic power in backup simulacra or clones... oh yeah. What about a deal that may see outsiders coming to claim the soul after the villain's demise? Or perhaps, your villain can talk to the living even after death, instructing them with the details required for his glorious return?



Using mythic power to make superb escapes (including drinking potions and temporary mobility-enhancing feats) and to negate damage are also great to ensure your villain survives a defeat - but ignoring abilities that would prevent an AOO will make your players hate them. Glorious! In cool synergy with mythic monsters, gaining a crowflight carriage is pretty neat! Being impervious to non-mythic, otherwise defense-bypassing tricks is also something neat - just gloat into that paladin's face as his smite evil poofs harmlessly against his defenses. Want to a reincarnation of an ancient evil? You can! Or perhaps, your villains need an additional trick to get rid of debuffs à la bleed, confused, etc. - what about a mythic power-based counterspell that also works with abilities which allow the villain to negate certain things? Yeah, pretty much awesome.



Also absolutely awesome - utterly breaking the mind of captives, turning them into your slaves, beholden as per the vow of obedience feat - the concise, easy mechanics for this help what can be considered massive, diamond-studded, narrative gold. Speaking of which - if the PCs are foolish enough to tackle a villain with "Triumph of the Will" by outnumbering him, they'll quickly notice that his annoying trick to reroll and force rerolls just got even worse - nice rationale for "I have to do this alone!" Oh yeah, capstone villains can reduce even those immune to fear to cowering heaps.. Have I mentioned the option to counter the expenditure of mythic power, best graced with a "Two can play this game!", "Denied!", "Your tricks can't stop me!" or similar phrase. Glorious!



Speaking of which - what about receiving 1 + 1/2 tier swift/immediate actions per round? In the hands of the right class, this ability alone may help one villain stand against a significant majority of foes...Love it!



And if the villain one day has to die - what about dishing out a massive hereditary curse? And yes, that one can imho also spawn campaigns!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes with various nice pieces of full-color art, though Legendary Games-fans will know them from previous offerings. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and has handy internal links for maximum comfort in navigation.



All right, let's face it - PFRPG is geared more towards dishing out damage, less so taking it - defenses and staying alive are harder than dealing obscene amounts of damage, an issue exacerbated by the numerical escalation that is part of the mythic rules. This pdf is the answer (or at least one possible answer!) - with a huge array of awesome, flavorful abilities that increase the villain's staying power, help keeping the BBEG alive and even provide Plan Bs when he's slain, this pdf, as a toolkit, is not only useful for mythic games, but also for regular ones - though in either case, I wholeheartedly enjoyed the diversity and vast power of the respective tricks herein. While I'd generally wouldn't recommend putting this into player-hands due to a plethora of extremely powerful tricks made to offset the odds between party vs. one guy + henchmen, there is one example, where I would not want to miss this - WotW #6, endgame. Negate the "limiter" introduced by the story and let the PCs with their contingencies duke it out -no harm done: If they die, after all, they can always come back...



In one word - this pdf offers the favorite tricks of all our fiction and comic book villains - superb escape stunts, powerful options to fight another day, superb planning and yes, even heel-turning good allies of PCS...this is THE mythic villain's toolbox and should be considered a must-get purchase for any DM running a mythic game - your carefully crafted adversaries will last longer and garner more loathing, more influence, more power with the tools herein. I love this book and as such, I will rate it 5 stars +seal of approval - congrats to Jason Nelson and Clinton J. Boomer! Note, however, that I do NOT consider it a good idea to hand this over to player hands unless in very specific circumstances - these options are exceedingly powerful and made for the DM to cackle with glee.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Path of Villains
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

B04: The Cave Beast's Hoard
Publisher: AAW Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/23/2015 09:35:42
An Endzeitgeist.com review of the Revised Edition

This revised edition of the B04 module clocks in at 24 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 20 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



There is something you'll note from the get-go - you wouldn't know this module for what it once was. From a cleared layout to copious new artwork and maps, the production values have increased by a huge step, bringing this up to par with AAW Games' new standard. The font-size is also pretty small, making the module longer than one would think from the page-count. That out of the way, let's get to the meat of this revision.



The following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

...

..

.

Still here?

All right! First of all, the town of Woodwall is fully depicted, with settlement stats et al. - which may be nice...it becomes even cooler once you realize the town's unique fey-themed defenses and its unique magical fountain - indeed, there is quite a bit of research to be done in town (what about a sample legend?) and the overland map also helps vividly picture the environment. A quick investigation should point the PCs quickly towards an ominous "cave beast", which may or may not be a beast or a couple of people, who has been picking off people - one by one. Curious and sharp-witted players may realize here, that there is a theme connecting the disappearances...



The PCs are on a scavenger hunt here, checking mines, old forests and seas for clues of what has happened - and indeed, each place yields new hints and red herrings - and unique challenges with e.g. a nasty Gathlain sorceror - each of the places contains a piece of the puzzle, each place has become the doom of one fleeing apprentice of a particular, long-gone wizard - once these have been cleared out, only a fully mapped keep remains, wherein the PCs will have to brave a kobold infestation to fin the true nature of the cave beast - and no, they may believe the kobolds alone to be responsible, but a close examination of the treasure hoard will quickly disprove this thesis. And then, there is the final confrontation, with the animated golem, all made from the treasure of the long-dead wizard - and here is, where the module becomes awesome. The massive creature is exceedingly deadly - but throughout the module, the PCs could find ways to even the field - each apprentice has left them one way of making the fight easier and careful investigation in the beginning of the module can also provide means of making this challenging, cool puzzle-boss-fight more manageable.



Conclusion:
Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to AAW Games' two-column full-color standard, including gorgeous maps (with player-friendly versions!), copious amount of original artwork and full bookmarks for your convenience.



This happens when a company of dedicated individuals CARES. This old module, a blemish, has been changed to an extent, where you wouldn't believe that this and its predecessor are even related - the writing has vastly improved and Mike Myler has brought his A-game to the table not only the town, but the whole flow of the module much, much more impressive - and especially the way in which the furious finale has been upgraded to actually reward the actions of the PCs! This module rewards sharp players, provides diverse challenges and took Jacob Kellogg's least refined module and turned it into something beautiful. Add to that the massively increased production values and we have a classic example of "From Zero to Hero" - as provided, this revision is fun, diverse and offers multiple challenges for the PCs to face. I *really* love what has been done here, I applaud this level of commitment and I gladly award this revision 5 stars + seal of approval, rendering it a worthy addition to the canon of AAW Games-modules.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
B04: The Cave Beast's Hoard
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Perplexing Puzzles #2: Puzzle Chests
Publisher: Interjection Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/22/2015 05:52:24
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive pdf clocks in at 62 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 59 (!!!) pages of content, so let's take a look!



So, we've all been there - the ONE player who plays the skill-monkey isn't here. We're all waiting. There's this one player who's late to the gig, and without him, the PCs can't simply plunder their hard-earned loot.



We've all been there and now, instead of twiddling collective thumbs, we have this rather cool supplement. Or perhaps, you're looking for a way to challenge the brains of your PCs - I know mine love the change of pace a good puzzle brings, something mostly lost on most new-school modules. So how do these work?



Each puzzle lock is represented by one or more lines of d6s that show a certain number of eyes as a starting configuration. There also is a target configuration to open the chest. The goal is to change the starting configuration to the target configuration via set of moves. Each chest has a valid set of moves like e.g. 1, 2 -> 3, 4. Dice on the left side of the arrow are the input, those on the right side are the output. Any combination of the numbers shown as input is acceptable, as long as the first number is left of the second number. The input is removed from the sequence of numbers shown and the output is added in from the right. This may sound complex here, but it actually isn't when seen with visual representations of the dice.



Each of the puzzle boxes comes with its own sheet - said sheet not only has a detailed, dressing/so what's the chest-like description, but also a second page that handily sums up the target moves to win for the DM, should you be not that proficient with puzzles like this. Going one step beyond, suggested sample treasure and stats (hp, weight and hardness) are provided for each chest - including additional treasure of a rather iconic and unique nature - even "just" mundane items receive some unique representations.



Now beyond this initial configuration, suggested XP-values and CRs for the chests are provided - which obviously can be enhanced by traps. You see, certain combinations and chests may have moves and configurations that reset the chest and/or trigger a trap. If a short contemplation wasn't enough to hint at this - this system is so simple and elegant, yet downright brilliant, I've been using the hell out of it. Making your own puzzle chests with this is so easy, it's not even funny - and the added complexity you can add is nigh infinite - from certain sequence numbers adding or detracting from the number of output dice (to represent e.g. chests that open like origami flowers or close upon themselves) to ones that change everything - this system is exceedingly elegant and brilliant.



Oh, and the chests tell stories - beyond the description handed to the players, skills can be sued to glean more information and hints for the chest and yes, frustrated players may brute force them, but where's the fun in that? Optional special rules for resets and yes, some unique magical weapons can also be found herein - but that should not detract from the fact that this system works perfectly in ANY roleplaying system - I currently use it, for example, as a means of representing magical "hacking" into a quasi-atlantean civilization's devices. The chests? I scavenged them and their treasures for other components of my game.



It should be noted that, while the 20 base chests range from child's play to difficult, there also are 7 advanced chests - and these are EVIL. With complex special rules, multiple rows of dice , rows that may not be modified and only indirectly changed - yes, these are brain-teasers indeed and provide more inspiration than you can shake a stick at.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good. Layout adheres toa printer-friendly two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for oen's convenience. Artwork consists of origami-shapes and the pdf's chest-sheets are concise, easy to grasp and printer-friendly to boot.



I ADORE this book. Its system is used all the time in my home-game and my players enjoy the diversion and challenge this brings. It also doubles as an inspired little treasure book. So why did it take me forever to review this? Well, there are some glitches herein. Number 3, for example, is glitchy and lists the wrong legal moves. The correct moves should be:

1 -> 2

2 -> 3

3 -> 4

4 -> 1



This is not bad in my book. It took me about 1 minute to deduce them. But it is a flaw and one I hoped would be rectified so I could write the glowing recommendation this deserves. Alas, the pdf did not sell - at all. And reality hit. I do not fault Bradley Crouch for not investing even more time in this, but I figured, you should be aware of that - this is NOT a perfect pdf.

The plus-side, though, would be that this pdf now is FREE. Yes, you can actually download this massive, 50+ page book for free. Even if you only scavenge the dressing, the items etc., this is worth the download. Getting such an inspired, easy to use and easier even to expand puzzle system for free is even better. And completely offsets aforementioned flaws for me. I don't often write reviews of free products anymore, mainly since there doesn't seem to be a big interest in them (and I can barely keep up with the commercial ones!), but this is something PFRPG needs in my book:



A challenge for the brain.

A fun diversion.

A neat mini-game.

A call-back to the time when modules featured the like (and riddles!) more often. I wished this had sold more units - it deserves to see support. And it deserves it now, even more. So, let me urge you: Take a look. Download this. Try it out. Puzzles can be exceedingly fun and we all have to wait for that one player stuck in traffic once in a while...don't we?



As a free product, this is stellar - even with its flaws, and well-worth 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Perplexing Puzzles #2: Puzzle Chests
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Mythic Options: Core Mythic Class Features
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/22/2015 05:49:56
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This Mythic Options-pdf clocks in at 24 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page advertisement, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 20 pages of content, so let's take a look!



So what are mythic class features? In a nutshell, they are the upgrades of class features, count as 1st tier universal path abilities and can be taken in lieu of a mythic feat. They require a character to have the base class feature to take them, so no weaseling around the prereqs. Simple, right? Yeah, thought so too!



This pdf then goes on to present the mythic upgrades of class features for all the core classes - and yes, if you already have a certain pdf that does just that for the rogue, RGG has you covered and you should have received this - which is downright superb customer service indeed!



The Barbarian, for example, covers a vast array of rage powers with mythic upgrades herein -which e.g. include extending fearless rage to allies and also interesting rules choices that go beyond what one normally can execute - adding via Mythic Quick Reflexes a second AoO, tier times per rage, to the attacks executed against a target for moving out of the barb's space, for example, is a very interesting instance where the rule of maximum AoOs is broken in a controlled and interesting manner - nice!



Now the capstone Mighty Rage may be a bit much - autoconfirming all crits in rage and, with mighty swing, declare one hit to be a crit per rage is pretty nasty...but then again, that is 20th level mythic gameplay...Still, very much feels like a bit too much to me - also since it kind of points you towards high-crit-builds, which isn't necessarily the direction one would expect from a barbarian.



The bard's mythic class features obviously cover the performances and adding breath of life to the soothing performance should be commended here - neat one indeed! The high-level jack-of-all-trades, which provides tier as ranks in all skills can be considered another very powerful example - which I generally LIKE for the bard - it fits. But at the same time, the existence of this ability somewhat invalidates spreading skills for other classes, so not sure whether I'm sold on the unlimited nature of this one's execution. I think, I would have gone for a tier-dependant wild-card with tier- or power-based uses instead.



Clerics can have their aura enhanced to provide SR against one of the opposing alignment components - which makes sense in so many ways, it's not even funny - kudos! The different domain powers covered are neat as well, though a typo that confused "attach" with "attack" had me stumble for a second. I also don't get why the air domain, which grants mistsight by anything but the mentioning of murk, does not simply grant this mythic ability - introducing this second set just causes potential confusion between the two. And yes, this is me being a nitpicky prick, I know.



Druids can have mythic abilities added to their companions and even receive a temporary feat of the form the druid chooses to wildshape into - the latter being at once awesome and very powerful - but here, I am not complaining, since the design decision just makes all kinds of sense to me. Timeless body, while not that game-relevant, should also be commended - amping up a lifespan to almost a millennium? Heck yeah, hugging trees suddenly sounds so much more compelling! ;P (And yes, the Monk's timeless body is different and less potent - though I do think, streamlining them into the same ability wouldn't have been unreasonable - think of the myths of the longlived, mystical senseis...)



Mythic fighter and rogue class features have already been covered by yours truly, so I'm going to skip them, which renders the monk the next on our list. Here, we have a cool, but also potentially very problematic option - adding additional flurry attacks to the single attack that can be used as an attack action. Yes, this means tier-based scaling of the amount of attacks the monk can execute with one attack - and while the pdf gets interaction with Vital Strike, haste, etc. right, I was still left kind of worried - primarily, because the pdf does not explicitly states that adding the extra attack imposes the penalty of flurrying -it can be gleaned from the context, yes, but still, I feel that the pdf, to avoid misunderstandings, could have spelled that one out slightly clearer. Again, me nitpicking, I guess.



The paladin's features provide a neat set of numerical escalations, with especially receiving the archon's aura of menace, powered by mythic power, being pretty cool - especially, if you're thinking about some angel-specific feats and tricks that could be used by the paladin this way...just thinking aloud for the eventual release of Mythic Monsters: Angels, mind you! Now free mythic power-based switching of mercies may be a bit too much for my tastes, but depending on your personal preferences, you may not mind that one. Other than these, we have steed-enhancers, increased aura-ranges - all in all, solid, but pretty powerful.



Rangers may 1/day insta-retrain combat-style feats and receive all the numerical boons you'd expect. Here would be as good as place as any to complain about mythic evasion, which allows you to expend mythic power to halve damage you receive. Its explaining sentence refers to rangers in some of its non-ranger-iterations and provides said example: "Thus the ranger could use mythic evasion to halve the damage you take from a poison if he failed his save, but not any damage the poison deals after its initial effect." Why am I complaining about this? Because it has nothing to do with evasion any more - it's the evasion-mettle-super-hybrid, usable for any damage source, even those sans save. This is, even for mythic games, crazy strong - yes, it uses a limited resource, but not a particularly rare one. I showed this one to my players and the unanimous consent was that the ability would be pretty much a must-have trick for the eligible classes - so many ways to avoid death. Note: If you do allow this ability, I'd strongly suggest from refraining to add any item, ability or the like that can store mythic power for further use. (Yes, they exist...) Why did I not complain about that for the rogue? Because the rogue can use the ability. Same goes for the monk. But the ranger? Here, a more limited ability would definitely have been in order! On the plus-side, the rogue's mythic sneak attack now is streamlined and unambiguously functional.



The Sorceror's mythic bloodline ability deserves special mention in my book, mainly because it does provide you a formula that can be utilized to add it to bloodlines not explicitly used in this pdf - these general guidelines are hard to craft and I applaud their inclusion herein. Spellcasting as a defining class feature for wizards now allows for limited poaching in other spell-lists and upgrading spellbooks to grant the benefits of specialists also feels pretty awesome - this makes the trope of the archmage missing his divination book make much more sense... Oh, and generally, familiar upgrades can be considered overdue.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, though not perfect - I noticed a couple of glitches, though none of the crippling variety. Layout adheres to Rogue Genius Games' printer-friendly two-column standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. Artwork is thematically-fitting stock and the pdf sports hyperlinks, though oddly some abilities lack hyperlinks to the more obscure (and thus needed) mythic abilities. A minor point, though.



This one's odd - on the one hand, I wouldn't want to miss this pdf in any of my mythic games. On the other, I would never flat-out allow all of the content herein. The pdf sports at the same time Owen K.C. Stephens' superb ability to craft solid rules with gloriously streamlined abilities that can be scavenged to add new pieces yourself, while on the other sporting numerous small discrepancies that add up - mistsight in anything but name may be okay...but why is there this odd discrepancy between the two timeless body-abilities, while the exceedingly strong mythic evasion remains unnerfed for the very powerful ranger-class? (As mentioned above - fitting for rogue and monk...but rangers?)

There are quite a few of these small hiccups here, so much that they add up - but alone, they wouldn't be considered a detriment. And then there's the elephant in the room: The simple truth that all of these class features use the same resource - while obviously providing VAST discrepancies in individual power-levels. You can min-max pretty hardcore with this mythic upgrades, with the power-levels ranging from okay/situational/nice to must-have-powerful, bordering on OP, even for mythic games. So yes, I consider this a must-have supplement for mythic rules, but only for the DM, who ought to carefully consider which of these mythic class features to introduce to the game and which to leave out. In the end, this pdf feels like it could have used some more streamlining, an additional editorial pass - as provided, it is a book containing greatness, yes, but also one that remains ultimately flawed with it not even remotely bothering with balancing the class features by the amount of investiture that unlocks them, thus creating a serious flaw in the very basic mechanic underlying these mythic class features. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded down to 3, while still coming with an explicit recommendation for the discerning DM.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Options: Core Mythic Class Features
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Mythic Minis 48: Mythic Gloves and Bracers
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/22/2015 05:45:48
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 4 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 2 pages content, let's go!



-Arcanamach's Vambrace: Magic Vestment that counts as mithril; characters with Arcane Strike may use that bonus to CMD instead of as a bonus to damage and also enhances Arcane Strike-powered aid another. Additionally, the weapon wielded counts as silver and magic and the bonuses granted by the feat may be extended to allies when attacking the same creature. Mythic characters get improved action-economy and numerical escalation. Pretty interesting design!



-Razor Couters: Add damage and bleed to unarmed attacks as swift action; When fighting defensively, this damage can also be caused as an immediate action. Additionally, the item can be commanded to launch wounding shuriken, with the amount launched depending on the action used. Mythic characters inflict bleed that is difficult to heal - pretty damn cool!



-Errant's Gage: When using challenge, smite or the like, using this item provides for an increase in potency of the ability and mythic characters see even more significant bonuses - like it!



-Felonious Fingerless Gloves: These gloves are well-glamered and easy to hide, helping with all kinds of roguish behavior and increase the effective level for trap-related abilities and rogue talents based on level. Mythic characters may even reroll Disable Device or Sleight of Hand-checks when using mythic power. Finally, tricksters gain the crime spree ability - straightforward, but nice.



-Serpentiginous Gloves: Pernicious and accelerate poison (alas, non-scaling DC) - but the touch-delivery crunch works well, so that's a plus. Oddly, the hyperlinks for aforementioned effects render the letter a larger font, which looks a tad odd. Mythic power can be used to animate the fingers of the gloves like vipers to deliver poison effects - solid, I guess, but the fixed DC is pretty weak and low.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, I noticed no significant glitches apart from the font-hiccup, which does not influence the crunch and thus, not the rating. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Jason Nelson's gloves and bracers range from the very cool to the rather limited and can be considered worthwhile additions to a campaign, though ones that perhaps are not per se mandatory - the items are well-crafted and juggle complex mechanics, but did not 100% blow me away. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 48: Mythic Gloves and Bracers
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Dance Macabre
Publisher: Four Dollar Dungeons
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/21/2015 09:41:43
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module clocks in at 90 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 86 pages of content, so let's take a look!



Now the first thing, before anything else, you should know that this literally is the only book you need to run the module - no switching to thousands of different books, not a full bag of supplemental material - this module provides more supplemental material than you can shake a stick at: First, we get all spells used in the book; then, there would be the rules-reference section, which includes all those handy special abilities, from ability drain to breath weapons, handily explained for your convenience. The same goes for magical items, btw. And yes, there even is a nice array of animal tricks explained for your convenience, rendering this module exceedingly comfortable to run. Beyond even that, though, we get something you can use even when not running the module - the bestiary-section does provide ample Knowledge DC-checks to deduce information on the respective creatures featured in the module. Oh, and the module does sport all artwork handily collated at the back of the book in the form of a collated appendix, allowing you to print it out as a kind of look-see-artwork-booklet.

Think that takes up too much space? Let me assure you, it doesn't - the module, even after that, clocks in at a massive 52 pages - there is *A LOT* of content to be covered. It should also be noted that this module, like all 4$D-modules, does provide handy lists of CR, adversary, XP and treasure for each relevant encounter, including options for extra treasure, depending on your playstyle (and extra PCs - up to +2 PCs are thus supported without you having to do ANYTHING). You should also be aware of the vast amounts of maps - while not necessarily beauties, I've seen worse and EVERY relevant location is covered - the sheer amount of maps provided deserves applause, especially since they also come with high-res jpegs and player-friendly iterations.



It should also be noted that the unique town herein does sport an extra mini-gazetteer for the players and that a clue-flow-chart helps running the module.



So far for the formal criteria, now let's take a look at the module itself, shall we?



Now before we dive in, this is the SPOILER-WARNING. Potential players should immediately jump to the conclusion. Seriously, you will be so sorry if you spoil this one for yourself.

...

..

.

All right, so this module begins common enough - a drunk father and ratcatcher, bereft of his daughters (who have chosen the adventurer-lifestyle) have recently taken off and the grief-stricken father immediately tries to pick a fight with the PCs. However that works, in the end, the PCs will have been tasked by the man to track down his daughters and ensure their safety - and the trail leads into the aptly-named twisted moorland. Now if you have played the supreme "Journey to Cathreay", you'll immediately realize the sheer massive amount of detail you can expect from 4$D wilderness trips - and this module does feature just that - random weather-tables (with all relevant rules), random encounter chances by time - the level of detail is staggering and from lone guest-houses to the farm where the two adventurers hang out (sans the daughters, mind you, and very much hostile...), the level of detail provided is interesting indeed - take e.g. a druidic stone circle, where the devout PC may acquire a temporary elemental servant - not required by the story in any way, but it does add the sense of cohesiveness and realism to the magical world depicted herein.



Now whether on friendly or hostile terms with aforementioned adventurers, the PCs sooner of later will make the acquaintance of a dryad of a forest most dilapidated and desolate, who ahs struck a deal to ensure her survival - and in case you haven't noticed, yes, there is a subtle theme at work here, but more on that later. Her combat tactics come with a level of detail scarcely seen, and from TPKing to less lethal failure scenarios and the like, the encounter with the pragmatic, corrupt dryad offers quite an array of different options. Now, alternatively, the PCs may have found among the adventurer's belongings a call for help in clearing out an evil temple or have been bluffed by them - in either way, the temple is just another elaborate anti-adventurer trap, much like the dryad's gambit. If this does not look to exciting so far, rest assured that the way in which this is handled is superb - and the level of detail provided here is staggering as well - take a skeleton with a foreign pterodactyl bone rattling in its rip cage - and yes, this is a curious and intriguing foreshadowing of the things to come.



Either way, the investigation sooner or later will bring the PCs to the aptly-named town of Twisted Bridge, where a special kind of evil flourishes. The town is not a poor place; in fact, it is quite wealthy (and fully statted). However, it is a town rules by egotism and passivity- we have a macabre blending of gillmen working menial labor and a kind of aristocratic upper class, sneering at the irrelevant, marginalized people that do not belong to the illustrious crowd of the village's people - here, everyone is in only for themselves and their immediate friends and family. Mind you, this is not a depiction of a town that is suppressed or "kill 'em all"-vile - it can be considered almost a subtle satire of a mentality that is all too real in our very world. Sounds too dreary? Players not into subtle, unobtrusive social commentary? No problem, just spring on them the top-hat wearing deinonychus currently running a errand for his master and they'll be right back in the fold. And yes, this is one of the colorful sight &sound-style random encounters form the table. On a mechanical level, the mentality that considers "evil" behavior a matter of discussion and the townsfolk's fun when looking at paladins whirling from all the evil they can detect is not only rationale and concise, it makes surprising sense and adds a whole new spin on the black-white-morality conundrums.



Twisted bridge itself is not only mapped, but also sports what essentially amounts to a lavishly-detailed gazetteer-section that had me reminisce about the weird cities in 3.X's Scarred Lands, though, obviously, in less depth, Twisted Bridge definitely can be considered a town so unique and dripping with flavor and tangible magic, it exudes an allure that is difficult to describe - from undine sorcerors to lizardmen, from chocolatiers to female-only hair-saloons (aptly and humorously named "Rapunzel"), twisted bridge equally breathes a sense of decadence and wonder, of despicable passivity and carelessness and intoxicating wonders - and allows one to easily see how one can be sucked into the moral choices such a lifestyle may engender. The massive investigation-potential and related clues definitely allow for one glorious free-form investigation, set against one of the most compelling backdrops I've seen in quite a while.



The trail of the girl's horses, though, can sooner or later be tracked to a farm - where matrons grow narcotics to allow the people in town to sedate their children, should they act up - have I mentioned, that, much like many a good fantasy or scifi novel, this module can be enjoyed on a consumerist perspective and still has some serious social commentary going for, should you be so inclined as to delve into it, all without shoving an ideology down your throat? Among the narcotics-inducing plants, though, jack-o-lanterns loom, including a moderately intelligent one, with whom the PCs can talk, alternating quickly between settings of potentially psychedelic horror and abject comedy - oh and then there is a level of detail that borders on the ridiculous, the ridiculously awesome, that is - the fields actually note which plants are grown where: From chai to chilies, the handout provides the detailed notes on this. Yes. *That* is a realism that can only be described as staggering -and whether you use it or not, it does add immensely to the sense of immersion. The trail, then, leads to the cathedral of bone, the macabre abode of the town's de facto dhampir-ruler and aforementioned, top-hat wearing dinosaur companion. There *is* a macabre axe-beak skeleton to be found here, but whether or not hostilities break out depends very much on the PC's actions - and yes, the reason *why* a friggin' axe-beak skeleton is here, is also given - and the pterodactyl bone mentioned before may give the PCs away, so let's hope their investigation skills are on par.



Among the weird places to be found (potentially via the nasty adventurers), an alchemist (vivisectionist) and the way golem he created as an automaton to sate the depraved desires of the townsfolk can also make for interesting encounters, the latter even for a potential cohort of the oddest kind. Tzitzimitle, the main antagonist of the module, currently resides in a clock tower most unusual - in that e.g. it sports a pool that is inhabited by piranha-level voracious, bad-tempered killer-goldfish. No, I'm not kidding. This is a thing - and it is glorious. My players actually started laughing as their PCs started to be chomped by the little buggers. The exploration of the tower, alas, yields no satisfactory results (apart from further leads and the satisfaction of destroying clockwork creatures and braving the traps with which the place has been laden) - and so, a further stop along the way may be the massive Necropolis of the town, where the bored, amoral gargoyle Gabriel, a picturebook sociopath, awaits - alongside Enya, one of the kidnapped girls, who is currently trapped within a mausoleum that is both warded and dangerously unstable - and hence, rescuing her will prove to be difficult.



Have I mentioned, that her statements (or the alchemist's investigation) can lead them to essentially the same goals, namely the sewers, where the whispers of the dead abound and a worm-that-walks, the gaoler of Enya, provide further evidence of the horrible things to come: And it is at the very latest here that the pieces will *click* together - Tzitzimitl, an exceedingly powerful oracle (level 10) who has gleaned the circumstances of his death, but not the particulars, has entered an unholy alliance with a powerful wraith named Yetaxa - with combined efforts, they have not only engineered all those nasty anti-adventurer traps the PCs had to face; they have also introduced a truly decadent festival to the town, wherein the living dance with the wraiths under the control of Yetaxa - at the low price of just one innocent to be wraithified per festival - and who cares about strangers? Hence, the first of the daughters, alas has already been transformed by Yetaxa in the general rehearsal of the last festival -for today, shall be different. Wraiths cannot endure the sunlight, but a total eclipse renders a festival today possible - and also the only way in which Tzitzimitl's prophecy of his own doom could come to pass - hence, he has engineered this rather elaborate plot to prevent just that.



Alas, the festival, detailed with a concise timeline and hearkening to a carnival, through a glass darkly, proceeds - and provides the PCs with an option to save Enya - provided they have been smart enough to provide her with an amulet they can acquire, which renders her impervious to Yetaxa's cruel attempts of transferring her to undeath - so, in a finale both decadent and epic, the PCs will have to destroy Yetaxa in the catacombs - success frees the wraith and spawn from his control, resulting in a massacre and the prophesized death of Yetaxa, while also putting the PCs in dire peril, as they are shepherded into a dead end by now free, vast amounts of undead - only to be saved alongside Enya by the rays of the sun emerging from beyond the eclipse - and yes, if played right, this *is* one hell of a finale that also sees a town made uninhabitable by the undead - as well as killing the powerful Tzitzimitl and setting him up for potential sequels as a new undead threat to face!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, though I noticed a couple of minor typos, though the pdf has cleaned up and fixed the worst offenders immediately. Layout adheres to 4$D's printer-friendly two-column standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The pdf comes in two versions, one for the US-paper-format, one in A4 for Europeans like yours truly - love that! The artwork provided is copious and I have seen none of the neat, old-school b/w-art before - really nice! The cover, as always, is also breathing the spirit of old-school awesomeness. The cartography is functional, as are the handouts, and make up for not being the most beautiful being provided for just about EVERYTHING.



Okay, let me get one thing out of the way - my complaint about the typos above, now mitigated by the immediacy of them being fixed? That is the only negative thing I can say about this module. At this point, all of the following things are a given: 1) Whenever Richard Develyn releases a module, my players want to play it asap, even if it means putting the main-campaign on hold. 2) I actually go to these modules when I require a break from reviewing; when I'm frustrated and need a reminder of why I actually do it. 3) Every module has a radically different style.



All of these hold true with Dance Macabre - even though formally, like "The Key to Marina", it can be considered an investigation module. Alas, the way in which it works is pretty much radically different - less of a scavenger hunt, more of a detective tale, it reminded me in the best of ways of the first Gabriel Knight game in the atmosphere it evokes - what we have here can be called a blending of far-out fantasy with the underrepresented panache of proper, fantastic Southern Gothic. From the themes provided to the imagery evoked, the glorious sense of decadence oozes from each and every pore of the module - you can play this as pure entertainment...or emphasize the striking themes it evokes: If you want it to, this module can serve as a social commentary and a rallying cry against indifference and cold-heartedness.


The absurd amount of details provided help running the module immensely, and so does the flow-chart, though novice DMs still should read the whole module before trying to run it - this one is very much free-form in its flow. The true genius here, at least in my onion, would be the blending of the horrific and the absurd, of horror and comedy - and the optional nature of either. A competent DM can easily ramp up the comedy factor and make this module genuinely funny. Or utterly horrific. I ran this module twice prior to writing this review; the first time emphasizing a Ravenloftesque sense of horror for my mature players - and it worked perfectly. The second time around, I mastered this with a mixed group that contained some kids - and emphasized the fun and odd parts. Yes, there are some dark elements here, but nothing kids (talking about the 8 - 12-range) can't handle - make e.g. the courtesan a menial laborer à la Cinderella and we maintain the message, but make the theme child-friendly - cosmetic reskin and that's it. One of them surprised me when she mentioned that she had understood that fear of death can lead one to horrible choices, that one should instead do good and that the town exhibited traits of our own society - and that payback for such a behavior might come in some guise or another. Subtle themes, clearly understood - yes, this can actually be played as a morality play with some educational value.



Southern Gothic horror, absurd, but still exciting comedy or a means of teaching about the world - the module provides a lot of playstyles - and it ran completely differently both times I ran it, so it has replay value to boot! I *ADORE* this module. It is unique in every sense of the word and sports yet another facet of Richard's capacity that sets him apart as one of the few authors who push the boundaries and raise the level in the art of adventure writing. And yes, this module, in my opinion, can be called art...or proper literature. It is excellent and while the odd typo here and there may be slightly annoying; it is mainly due to the exceedingly high level of quality of the whole book this catches one's eye. Still, I implore you to get this awesome piece of adventure-writing. It is unique in all the right ways and acts as one glorious example of what adventures could be beyond rolling dice and slaying monsters. Highly modular, versatile and with replay-vale, oozing with details, this module once again receives my highest honors - 5 stars + seal of approval and since this was released in 2014, candidate for my Top ten of 2014-status.



Do NOT let this one slip by!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dance Macabre
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Underworld Races: Dødelig
Publisher: AAW Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/21/2015 09:38:37
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Underworld Races-series clocks in at 21 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 16 pages of content, so let's take a look!



We begin, as always for the series, with the epic stories of the cataclysms that have shaped Aventyr's underworld, before delving into the race-specific history of the dødelig. So, what are they? Well, the short answer would be that they are the vessels and creation, the last-ditch gambit, of Aventyr's first lich - cornered by the crystalline, undead-loathing colloid, the lich tore himself asunder and spread his essence into the petrified skeletons of halflings his familiar had unearthed. Thus, the dødelig were born, and yes - they managed to escape the certain annihilation under the crystalline gleam of the colloid.



They scoured the underworld, finding more skeletons and awakening them, guided by the sundered remains of what remains of the dracoprime. Now interesting would be the very fact that these guys are not evil, maintaining mostly the behaviorisms and hearty nature of their parent race. The cover provides a good impression here - I try to picture them as what would happen if the glorious día de los muertos (seriously, if you can, at least once go to Oaxaca to celebrate that!) met with halflings and were extended for all the time - after all, these guys do not have to plow or sow anymore...



The dødelig receive + 2 Dex and Wis, -2 Str, are small and undead (cha instead of con-mod, immunities to bleed, mind-affecting effects, death effects, disease, paralysis, poison, sleep, stunning, nonlethal damage, ability drain, exhaustion, fatigue, energy drain, damage to physical attribute scores or effects that require fort-saves, unless they also affect objects) - yes, the full list. As undead, they are immediately destroyed upon reaching 0 hp or below, get darkvision 60 ft. and a movement rate of 30 ft. They also receive DR 5/bludgeoning, stonecunning and their petrified body can be affected by spells dealing with stone, potentially causing nasty damage and slow. They may also, 1/day as an immediate action, benefit from positive energy as a though they were alive - only for 1 minute, but still. They also suffer from light blindness and exposure to sunlight deals 1 point of Cha-damage per hour - no save. Ouch. So, what do I think about the dødelig's crunch? I honestly consider them to be a bit too front-ended regarding the array of full undead immunities. While this is counterbalanced somewhat by the fragility (0 hp = dead) of the race and the light-based detriments, the race is also limited by the former - but more on that later. So are they strong? Yes. Are they broken? No, not really, but they may be too strong for the grittier of groups - when all is said and done, though, they should not cause grief in most groups and thus are one of the few undead races that kind of get it right.



The racial favored class options provided are neat and relatively unique in that they provide negative energy bonus damage, for example. The alchemical items, including performance-enhancing bone xylophones and obsidian bullets that render slings more valid also are pretty neat.



The dødelig feats provide for means that you will want for your adventuring undead halfling -from options to freeze-style conceal yourself exceedingly well in rocky environments to help when disguising as a living halfling, these are very useful. Dødelig who opt for the racial bonus to skills granting feat that represents memories of an old life may also learn to alter self to assume temporarily the semblance of the living form of their former life. Two secondary claw attacks at 1d4 also exist here and one feat increases the amount of gold you start with and how much you tend to find.



By using ground dødelig remains, you can suppress magical auras (but not the magic) and there also are items to hide your undead nature from detect spells, increase your necromancy or cause those listening to dance akin to a certain irresistible dance. Dødelig also come with 4 spells - one to detect dødelig at greater range (and stone - you have to free your brethren!) and one to fuse with other undead to turn into a larger-sized bone-conglomerate - nasty! A spell to create dødelig from living halflings and one that makes you count temporarily as a halfling can also be found here - they are solid, but did not blow me away - as a note, though: The dødelig-transformation spell could make them quite an eerie threat: When famine or disease rage through the lands, transformation into a skeletal undead may seem like a good idea...



Now if the feats and racial weaknesses have not been ample clue - this race has a pretty hefty investment tax to work well in some contexts - the 3-level racial paragon-class Day Rambler can be considered such an example. The class receives +1 BAB over the levels, +3 fort-and will-saves, +1 ref-saves and +3 natural armor. The class nets d10, 2+Int skills and caps the amount of damage the dødelig can take per day at 3 minus the number of day rambler levels. The ability that makes them temporarily benefit from positive energy also is enhanced and lasts longer, they lose light blindness and get sharp hands as a bonus feat - or increase the damage die by one -for a base damage of 2d4, which is slightly odd, since usually, there would be a dice-step-progression à la d4 -> d6 -> d8 etc.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good - I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to the beautiful 2-column standard established for the series and Jacob Blackmon's gorgeous, original artwork is neat. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience



So, by all means, I should not like these dødelig-guys - I've been pretty vocal about my dislike for massive hidden character-resource taxes, like the one that warrants the existence of the 3-level paragon-class. I'm also not known for much leniency regarding races that get access to the massive array of undead immunities - but here, much like for Kobold Press' darakhul, the detrimental effects are required to render the huge slew of immunities worthwhile without upsetting the balance. The dødelig that wants to work flawlessly in a regular society will have to think fast and out of the box - but that works with this race rather well.

Know what I love about these guys? In spite of the grim background story, in spite of being undead - these guys are surprisingly fun and playful, exhibiting one of the strengths of Mike Myler as an author - what my group tends to call fundead. Are they perfect or as culturally distinctive as some of the other races in the series? No, but they rock - pun intended. These stone skeletons are cool, if limited. I really wished they had less immunities and less of a general ability-tax/character investment required to render them operable in the surfaceworld, though - in regular campaigns, players will need to carefully plan to make these guys work and for some low-end campaigns, they may be a bit much. And I don't get why the undead traits aren't spread over the 3 levels of the paragon-class - it imho would make sense to strengthen the ties towards undeath and the stone-nature of the dødelig would make for a nice rationale for such a decision, while also putting player agenda higher on the list: Want to play a halfling skeleton? Here you go. Want to play a halfling skeleton with full undead immunities? Here are a couple of levels of racial paragon... What I'm trying to say is - this is not perfect, it's not for every group and it could have been a tad bit more streamlined - but it remains a surprisingly well-crafted book that presents the first non-grim/dark undead PC race. Hence, this is a good book for me - well worth a final verdict of 4.5 stars - and since I have a policy of in dubio pro reo, I will round up.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Underworld Races: Dødelig
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Mythic Monsters: Mythos Too
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/21/2015 09:36:38
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic Monsters-series clocks in at 32 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 2 pages of introduction, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page inside of back cover, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 21 pages of content, so let’s take a look!



As always, we kick off this installment of the Mythic Monsters-series with a supplemental piece of content – this time with what can be considered a definition of creatures of the farthest realms beyond - if you're smelling 3.X's excellent Kaorti, wystes and similar creatures - well, the rules for alien cysts and the odd resin they use for weaponry confirms just that: We get rules for creatures distinctly from the material plane, but more alien than most outsiders can ever hope to become. The xenoid creature template (CR+0, +1 if the creature has 5+ HD) with its swift action true strike can definitely be considered a nice adaptation of the pseudonatural template. And yes, there is a mythic variant of the template provided, one that sports not only decay-inducing tentacles, but also a disturbing ability that may render helpless creatures into things from the realm beyond - a nod towards the concepts of degeneration and body horror.



But you're not here for the supplemental material, so let's take a look at those mythos creatures herein, all right? The CR 21/MR 9 Bhiole may not only cause earthquakes, they can coat just about everything in a devastating, entrapping slime with vast reach and significant area of effect. Being not particularly subtle, the quick awesome blow feat and sheer destructive power of them covers well the lethality one can and should expect from them. One of my favorite mythic creatures ever, the Color out of Space (check of Pelgrane Press' "The Dying of St. Margaret" for a great purist module featuring them!) clocks in at CR 12/MR 5 - with its aura of listless ennui, the option to destroy by contact and flow through foes and concisely-presented feeding mechanics true to the lore, the build is a beauty that is only enhanced in its subtlety etc. by the inclusion of the color-blighted mythic simple template. At the same CR/MR, the star-spawn of Yog-Sothoth receives some rather cool time-based abilities, which, when executed properly, could even annihilate groups well above the CR/MR of the creature.



The CR 6/MR 2 elder things have an odd formatting glitch - none of the signature abilities are bolded, but that does not detract from e.g. force resistance or the ability to hurl bioenergetic concussive cysts. The synergy with mutation rules (featured in e.g. the Gothic Campaign Compendium) helps as well. At one CR and MR higher, the eye of the deep receives the option to execute swim-by-attacks and yes, conjure forth illusory images of strange civilizations long passed into well-deserved obscurity, images that may haunt your dreams... At the same CR/MR, Mi-Go become item creation tricks and particularly deadly claws - still, this one fell a bit on the weak side - but perhaps that's just the fanboy in me being disappointed that their eerie "benevolence" has no additional mechanic representation or instant brain-in-a-jar-ification trick. While we're at the mythos races - Yithians clock in at CR 11/MR 4 and gain not only defensive precognition, they also receive the signature amnesia and mind swapping capacities known from the lore. Snapping off limbs with pincers, suction and projection into the future render the yithians herein just as awesome as they ought to be.



If you've recently been spooked by some of the images circulating around the internet, you may wish to introduce flying polyps, which, at CR 17/MR 7 receive not only reflexive blasts of same that may send foes prone, their attacks may even daze or stagger and vast areas covering windstorms that may slow you, tornadoes and breath weapon like, devastating wind blasts make for a creature predisposed towards a horror/catastrophe combo - and a creature that can, in theory, hound adventurers for a whole module.



One creature I did not expect to find herein, but which fits definitely, would be the morlock - at CR 3/MR 1, they are a great example of good low-CR monster-design - with swarming, knockout blows and quick ways to drag targets off, they represent a superb rendition of the concepts - one of my favorites in this book, actually! Adding a charming effect to the Skum at the same CR/MR also makes for a very unique take on them that resonates well with mythos lore.

The CR 5/MR 2 nightgaunt gets a nausea-inducing tickle and can shred armors - but is apart from those not as interesting as most creatures in this book.



But what about the star-spawn of cthulhu, you ask? At CR 25/MR 10, these guys can become essentially immortal, with an ability quoting the famous lines "even death may die." Know all those abilities that prevent getting an AoO? Well, these guys ignore them. Mind-blasts, massive attribute drain, tsunamis or terrible mind contact - these guys are deadly; more so than the bestiary 4 rendition, which disappointed me. That being said, I'm still not sold on this one either - the star spawn is lethal, yes, but I still feel like it could have used some more cataclysmic AoE potential -and their natural attack damage output is pretty pitiful for such a high CR creature. Mind you, that is me being a hard-to-please fanboy - 2d6+18 per claw, 1d8+9 per one of the 6 tentacles may be enough for you...



Now the new creature herein finally brings the flavor of Shub-Niggurath to PFRPG, in the guise of the Blackgate Behemoth - dark young of shubby that may create the labyrinthine black gates, disgorge gibbering mouthers, hibernate and disrupt the very connection to the realms divine - with the complex tricks available via the tightly depicted gate and the other, unique options at the command of this CR 16/MR 6 beast, we have, yes again, we also have some subdued charming effects, as befitting of ole' shubby. As has become the tradition for the new creature, not only is the artwork great, it is also one of the best beasts in the whole book.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, I noticed no significant glitches apart from some minor formatting hiccups here and there. Layout adheres to Legendary Games’ nice two-column full color standard and the artworks by Michael Jaecks are beautiful. The pdf comes sans bookmarks, which constitutes a comfort detriment in my book.



Jason Nelson, Tom Phillips and Alistair Rigg deliver in this installment of the series - this one is definitely superior to the first smattering of mythos creature, providing the less than subtle, cataclysmic threats. Now I am a fanboy of the mythos. Heck, one of my MA topics back in the day dealt with the ideology, philosophy and myth-crafting with regards to the mythos and its influence on media and popular culture. I own the glorious silent movies and independent movies à la the color. When I'm fed up with PFRPG-reviewing, I read CoC or ToC o come down for a change of perspective. I *love* the subject matter - and hence, I'm a difficult audience.

I am not a big fan of the "kill em"-mentality of PFRPG with regards to the mythos and I really appreciate and use SAN-systems. That being said, as far as combat and, infinitely more important, narrative potential is concerned, this one provides ample fuel - quite a few creatures herein have abilities that essentially beg to be used as fodder for adventures. In this capacity, the mythos creatures work as well in the system as one can conceivably hope them to. However, at the same time, some of the beings do not manage to reach this inspired level and when compared to one another, some clearly sport more inspired renditions - compare yithians and mi-go, the star-spawn of cthulhu and the blackgate behemeoth and you'll know what I mean.



Still, in spite of my complaints - the fact remains: I'm a sucker for these creatures. I love their execution. And I will, in spite of the nitpicks and minor flaws, rate this 4.5 stars - and because I love e.g. the flying polyp to death, I'll rate up and slap my seal of approval on it. Iä!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Monsters: Mythos Too
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Bloodforge
Publisher: Dreamscarred Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/17/2015 03:35:16
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive book clocks in at 101 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with a massive 97 pages of content, so let's take a look!



So, the first race herein receives +... Wait. Wait a second. My usual in-depth analysis, piece-by-piece approach doesn't work here. This is literally a huge book of races and if I go into that level of detail, we'll be here come next Christmas-season. So, I'll paint a picture in broader strokes than usual, all right? First, if you're not 100% sure what this book is - this is essentially PFRPG's update of 3.0's Bastards and Bloodlines - a book much lauded for its creative race, but also somewhat notorious as one of the many, many ones in the 3.X era that had no idea whatsoever what this "Bahlenz"-thing is.



Speaking of this dreaded concept - the pdf does one thing right from the get-go: It ignores the flawed RP-guidelines established in the ARG in favor of an individual balancing, which I applaud. Each race comes with a short guideline as per name, appearance, demeanor, background and their relations to adventurers, with a handy table explaining the crossbreed-relationships. A massive age table and its corresponding height & weight-table also can be found herein, satisfying that pet-peeve of mine. Another component of the racial design I generally can applaud would be the equilibrium of racial bonuses/penalties - most, though, alas, not all races herein receive a bonus to a physical and a mental attribute and one penalty, resulting in races that are not by their design geared towards specific career paths. It should also be noted that the pd thankfully avoids attribute-bonuses of more than +2 per the base racial traits. Another pet-peeve of mine (and many a DM out there), races that can fly at first level, also are thankfully absent here - instead, a two feat-chain that begins with slow-falling via vestigial wings and ends with proper flight, tied to HD when applicable and thus circumvents this issue. Excellent work there. I do have something I'd like to mention - the pdf always uses the phrase "X can see in the dark out to 60 feet." for Darkvision. Something in me cringes when I read this sentence. It's usually "up to." Personal nitpick, though, and will not influence the final verdict.



Bastards and Bloodlines also did not have to deal with favored class options - which this massive book thankfully provides for quite a few of the classes, notably often also for Psionic classes, Akashic classes or Path of War classes - even though some of the aforementioned classes have not yet been released in their final iteration. This makes judging the effects of such FCOs impossible for me, so be aware that changes may court issues in the future there - emphasis on "may", mind you, and no, I'm not going to fault the pdf for that, mainly because I enjoy futureproofing when handled well. As a nitpick, I did notice minor quibbles à la missing plus-signs in FCOs à la "Add 1/4 to X" - nothing grievous, though.



The races generally sport alternate racial traits for further customization (with e.g. the elf/unicorn-hybrid alicorn also coming with alternate racial traits for evil brethren...)and each race comes with full-color art - which is something to be applauded...dreaded at the same time in this case - while most of the artworks herein are evocative and nice, others felt jarring to me - the spring child's facial expression was an uncanny valley experience for me and more creepy than the tentacle-faced, gorgeous thrallspawn. Movement rate-wise, we run the gamut from slow land speed 20 ft. to 40 ft. (sometimes not adhering to the proper nomenclature for the like, but never to the extent where the intent becomes opaque) - though, on a nitpicky side, the racial write-ups do not specifically note base movement rates of 30 feet. The pdf also introduces a bunch of racial subtypes in the beginning, which generally work, though here, once again, I have a nitpick - the slimeblooded subtype refers to the type of slimes, which does not exist - it's "oozes." Small hiccups like this can be found throughout the book, including a couple plural/singular glitches here and there - not to a bad extent, but to one that feels slightly less refined than usual for Dreamscarred Press-books.



Before I go into the races: Please, read the whole review, don't just abort after a few lines. Why? Because I went very nitpicky on this one, showcasing some of the issues the races sport and you might construe that as problematic - however, there are concepts herein that warrant close scrutiny beyond the races and the flaws I'm about to point out. So, please - at least read the conclusion. Thank you.



So let's take a look at the races, shall we? Elitist and proud hybrids of elves and giant eagles, the winged aellar - here, an interesting choice can be observed: Instead of providing Fly as a class skill via a racial trait, the race can opt into it via favored class options, many of which add the skill to the list alongside a bonus - though one that does feel a slight bit odd in the wording: "Gain Fly as a class skill and a +1/2 bonus." is okay wording-wise, but could have been slightly more elegant. On the plus-side, skill-starved fighters instead receive a full +1 bonus per FCO - I applaud that! Where I get grumpy is with the option to use the fly-skill in lieu of their reflex save when flying. Skills can easily be buffed through the roof. On the nitpicky side, I do love how they deal additional damage when charging while airborne, but I do think the damage type ought to be specified and linked to the weapon employed - admittedly, again, a nitpick. A second nitpick would pertain the nice ability of raptor's gaze, which decreases the miss chance incurred by 10%. balance-wise, I have no objections here, but logically, this should only extend to sight-based miss-chances, being based on eyes and all. As written, even blinded aellar in complete darkness would receive the benefit. Again - cosmetic gripe and won't make or break the pdf. Instead of vestigial wings, some aellar receive claws, which, I assume, follow the default damage values for the type and scale up to d6 later - why "assume"? Because the ability does not specify the base damage value, nor whether they are treated as primary or secondary natural weapons - yes, one can assume the default, but from a customer's point of view the information still ought to be here, at one glance. This issue with natural weapons can be extended throughout the pdf, btw. Now all of this may have sounded pretty nasty, but on the other hand, the short fluffy write-up is inspiring and the general competence is there - literally none of the aforementioned glitches are gamebreakers or can't be easily fixed.



So let's move on to the aforementioned alicorn, the first of quite a lot of fey-themed crossbreed races herein - the signature ability here being that the alicorn can transfer damage, diseases and poisons and ability damage to herself. I have literally no idea how this ability works. "The alicorn may only transfer damage (including ability damage) up to its character level in this fashion and any ailments only last for the remainder of their duration." So, does damage and ability damage count as the same resource? What if a disease or poison has caused more damage than the alicorn can absorb? Auto-failure of the ability or not or partial absorption? If the latter, does the original afflicted character still have to save? What about damage inflicted by curses and other magical means? Is the alicorn subject to the effects like secondary saves etc. of the effects of poison, diseases, etc.? Can an alicorn assume the damage of a disease when she's immune against diseases? Does she save versus such an affliction at the unmodified save or at the one modified by the attribute damage taken, if any? Also: No daily limit. Same goes for the inverse, evil variant of the ability. Both remain essentially in dire need of some serious clarification, also since they have an ability that nets them a minor bonus to AC after using the ability, which could prompt them to prick kittens with needles (1 hp damage), absorb it and heal their poor fluffy companion. Yes, this latter example is impractical and hardly gamebreaking, but I maintain the concept could have been executed more elegantly.



Blinklings, the blink dog/halfling hybrids, on the other hand, are awesome all-around- 3/day reactive concealment as an immediate action? Yes, please! Extending their sight to the ethereal? Utterly unique and cool - and has some neat narrative potential. Seriously, I love this race and its write-up!

I'm am strictly opposed to only one thing, an alternate racial trait that nets the benefits of blur instead of the reactive concealment - whenever the blinkling moves at least half movement rate. For agile characters, this is a no-brainer and will be pretty much always active - oh, and it's EX, which means no caster level, no means of suppression. That one ought to be axed or nerfed - hard - I'd suggest at minimum character level, for the *idea* is too cool to leave behind, but also too strong at lower levels.



Decataurs, Elf/Centaur-hybrids sport a base speed of 45 ft., which seemed odd to me and they ignore movement and skill-check penalties caused by difficult terrain - which seems excessive to me - why not provide a scaling mechanic here instead of downright immunity? While the provided caveat versus damage-causing terrain helps, several caltrop-y magic tricks would lead to confusion here. On the plus-side, the rest of the race is pretty much the best centaur-like race I've seen in quite a while. I feel obliged to mention that as per the writing of this review, the errata has not been incorporated into this book - it does specify how decataurs use horseshoes, not shoes, but due to fairness and since I think people should not have to look for errata, said fix will not influence my final verdict. Want another thing that's awesome about the race? Available as bipeds, for all those dungeon-campaigns with many, many ladders and ropes...



The freedom-loving Dreigi, half-giants with an ancient grudge (against fey and chaotic outsiders) are flavor-wise one awesome piece of work, with an inspiring artwork etc. - but their massive scaling bonuses versus aforementioned creatures (+2 to saves, damage and atk, +1 more for every 4 levels), is too much in my book - though that one is easily scaled down, and it should be. Why? Because these guys get two damn awesome signature abilities: For one, their attacks count as cold iron; they may also create 1/day difficult cold-iron caltrop-y terrain. Secondly, they ignore the hardness of magical barriers and add their character level to damage versus them. Yes, this means they have a fighting chance versus walls of force and the like. I love this race and really would enjoy it more, had it not this one critical flaw that otherwise mars a superb example of race design - it's also unnecessary, mind you, since the theme of pro-freedom/anti-enslavement also is reflected in quite a few other racial abilities.



You may have noticed something - no Tanis-syndrome race so far. And indeed, you will not find mopey, angsty half-breeds herein - take the Grendle, combining the best of parent race and troll, these guys are hardy and charismatic - and heal as if they had rested every hour. Apart from an unnecessary and imho rather OP ability to demoralize foes at +2 as an immediate action after being hit (or first level AoE-demoralize), the grendle is stylish and works very well - though the alternate racial traits feel confused: One mentions increasing a morale bonus to Str to +4 - a morale bonus thankfully cut in this iteration of the book, thus leading me to believe that we have a remnant of a previous iteration here. On the plus-side, gaining swim speed, but requiring 1 hour submersion in water to benefit from their healing each day is a pretty cool alternate racial trait.



Half-Gnolls are glorious - powerful, but lacking any issues (apart from once being called "It", to which some gnoll-aficionados will vehemently object) - scent and claws plus pack hunting - exactly what you'd want and expect! Hunting down fleeing foes is also neat, though an ability that automatically deals bonus damage versus foes suffering from debuffs should a) be more limited and restricted to the half-gnoll and b) once again, specify the damage type as belonging to the weapon used to execute the attack. Finally, since ranged builds already are pretty adept at the whole damage-dealing, I'd restrict the ability to melee - it's called Dominance, not "I shoot you from behind my allies." ;) Still, all in all, a great race, though the alternate traits can use some finetuning.



Speaking of finetuning - the half-goblinoids, while melee-centric, all can generally considered pretty cool - though again, the alternate racial traits and what they replace does not always match power-wise: What would you take: A +2 bonus to Perception and taking 20 for 30 ft x 30 ft as a full-round action or +8 (!!!) to Stealth and +4 (!!!) to Escape Artist plus the option to squeeze through tiny-sized areas? Yeah, the fast search is awesome - I like it. But I don't see these two line up - the bonuses of the latter are too pronounced in my book; I'd cut them in half AT LEAST. Half-hobgoblins see better in the dark than their parent race (90 feet that pretty sure should be 60 instead...), but apart from that, both they and the half bugbears are pretty damn glorious! Also on the strong, but cool side, half-sahuagin may be slightly too well off on the winner's end-side regarding bonuses, at least for my tastes, but in groups that sport powerful races, the will fit in perfectly - just as long as you ignore the "I get 4 arms, but no penalties/repercussions"-alternate racial trait, that on its own would have been exceedingly strong - that's not something to trade in for 2 paltry abilities, that's a defining characteristic of a whole race. And no, the pdf does not really explain how this many arms work re feats, item activation, etc. - a sidebox providing guidance would have almost certainly be appreciated by most players. Underworld Races: Hoyrall by AAW Games handled multiple arms in a pretty balanced, cool way, btw.



The Hexbreather, heirs to the dreaded hags, have some nice hex-related abilities in the base form, yes - but Str-damage versus claws at level 1 feels a bit nasty sans limits. One alternate racial trait also refers to the cursed condition, which does not exist. The half-nymph Houri are a gorgeous example (literally) of this book's tricks - no issues, functional, versatile and unique signature abilities (debuff-beauty 1/day or friend to all animals...). The same can be said about the Kestrel - good, positive halfling/harpy-hybrids that use their powers for good- generally. The Kijin are the elf/oni crossbreeds and hit two rough spots for me - one, they have a per-encounter ability. You all know how much I love those. Secondly, they essentially cover the same niche as Rite Publishing's wyrd - and the wyrd benefit from a much more detailed and for me, compelling, cultural background courtesy of the expanded room within they can operate - full pdf versus couple of pages. I don't consider them perfect either, but in direct comparison, the wyrd won for me. The same applies for the direct comparison of Rite's take on the lurker versus the one herein, though again, I consider both to fall slightly short of what they could be.



That being said, this pdf does manage an utterly admirable job at rendering the respective halfbreeds distinct and culturally unique - to the point where some of the brief fluff-write-ups actually captivated me enough to make me consider playing the half-breeds - and that coming from a guy who went out of 3.X with a distinct oversaturation regarding fiendish/celestial creatures and half-dragons as well as a distinct dislike for mopey halfbreeds. So yeah, this pdf can be considered inspired in that regard - from the roper/dwarf bio-weapons created by the phrenic hegemony to the love-conquers-all children of merfolk and men to the inspired and monstrous ornibus, suffused with the essences of howlers, the halfbreeds manage to avoid redundancy. And, if the above exercises in racial nitpickery were not ample clue for you - over all, they tend to be *almost* awesome - during my analysis, I regularly found myself enjoying myself and getting ready to write a recommendation for a race, only to have some ability overextend what I consider viable. Generally, about 1 ability among the racial traits, more often among the alternate racial traits, can be considered too strong and in need of nerfing - or its balancing versus its replacement feels like it is wonky. That being said - both the ornibus and the half-satyr pipers, for example, can be considered generally well-crafted - provided you can see past the numerous small violations of rules-semantics that make the RAI apparent, but are slightly less polished than what one would like to see. If you e.g. nerf down the +10 bonus to disarm for the Rana-race that can be received per expenditure of the psionic focus, we'll actually have a great, interesting race. (Rana are btw. Ophidian/Lizardfolk hybrids that usually grow up with the less intelligent lizardfolk and thus develop interesting mannerisms...)And yes, if that and the examples above were not clue enough for you - there is yet another thing I need to address regarding the races - and it's a HUGE plus!



Know how the ARG-races tend to feel somewhat sameish? How many races are just a recombination of the same tools, again and again? Not so here - every race herein has at least one unique trick that sets it apart - a racial signature ability, if you wish. I *love* this general idea, if not always the execution of them. - the half-gargoyles may e.g. use their wings to take 1/2 damage of an adjacent ally - think of it as a limited, immediate action-based shield other - interesting, though the wording could be more concise. Still, it is an ability like this that really sets the race apart and makes it feel distinct - also in a mechanical way. I have mentioned the tentacle-faced obvious heir to the half-illithids, haven't I? Yeah. The woodborn, which are just the race for anyone who ever wanted to tackle playing Pinocchio? Yeah, awesome. Even better - an alternate racial trait that nets you an assassin vine symbiote that deals more damage on a grapple just oozes style. Alas, it should have a slightly more precise wording: "This vine assists them during grapples, dealing 1d6+Strength modifier damage to other creatures in the grapple every round the woodborn maintains a grapple." - so does this mean that allied creatures in the creature/aiding also receive the damage? Why not go with a more standard wording for the damage? Winterwolf/Hellhound/Worg/humanoid half-breeds also deserve two thumbs up regarding their ability-suites.



Now this pdf does have more to offer than just a metric ton of half-breed races - namely templates - for bi/quadrupedal creatures, half-doppelgängers/medusas, half-elementals (!!!), half-rakshasas and also so-called titanblooded creatures - the templates are pretty solid all-around, with ample cool ideas and tools for mad scientists/transmuters to play with - nothing greivous to complain about here. The book furthermore offers a distinct array of feats, most of which have the [heritage]-descriptor. The feats run a wide gamut: We have for example one that substitutes a mental attribute for con - which would make me yell - however, it is restricted to bonus hp, not all the saves - which does, surprisingly, work for me. The presence of the Feral Fighter-feat feels a bit odd - it nets you claws or a bite as appropriate for your creature type. Why don't some of these races use this instead of the at times redundant or unnecessary-seeming amounts of natural weapons some receive - that would also put players agenda higher on the list. On the broken-side of thing, we can list e.g. bloodsong adept -which allows you to use bardic performance only affecting your type/subtype, but does not expend rounds of bardic performance. Urgh. Enter a party with the same race and we have unlimited bardic performance-rounds. Yeah. not gonna happen in my game and even feels cheap for NPCs - this one is hardcore broken and should imho get a serious nerfing bashing. On the okay-side, there are multiple SP-granting feats and some that e.g. net grab to add to bites and tentacle attacks - not a fan of the latter, but that is personal taste. Now on the other side, there is the Mixed Blood-feat, which is made of awesome and win - with a table of one whole page (!!!), it allows you to represent just about any odd bloodline/creature-type combinations - wanna go for a lawfully-infused orcish heritage? You can do that. This feat's concept is just great - and it's well-balanced to boot! Impressive one!



There also are 4 racially-themed PrCs - the brief run-down of them would be as follows:



The Bloodsong Heritor is the herald of his people - a solid, good bardic PrC with neat mechanics and not much but exceedingly minor nitpicks to complain about - were its prerequisite not aforementioned utterly broken unlimited performance feat, I'd be even more impressed - especially since the class does net more performance rounds and nice, unique performances that also include the expenditure of multiple rounds for interrupt-style effects while still maintaining the performance. Think of it as a less complex, much more limited and racially-themed take on what Interjection Games' Composition magic does. The Kith Hunter is an okay slayer-type 5-level PrC. Seen better, seen worse. The Kithlord can be considered a solid racial champion PrC with commander-style tricks/auras and even teleports at higher levels - okay, though I'd be wary of this PrC in a uni-race group - mostly great for NPC-adversaries, imho. The 5-level mongrel has the most choices among the PrCs, offering quite an ability-array to choose from and some rather unique bonuses - including ways of getting rid of ability damage by leeching off magic - nice one.



The book also sports a small selection of new spells, which can generally be considered among the more powerful examples available - they are not bad, mind you, but the option to e.g. have earthskin and stoneskin overlap may not fit well with some groups. That being said, spells that provide minor bonuses versus e.g. kobolds and goblins will not break anyone's game. The spells are solid.



Finally, the book provides new magical items, including 4 new special abilities, one of which nets you a standard action in a surprise round for just the equivalent of +1 - which seems too cheap, considering how pricey in terms of feat/ability-investment the like usually is. A +1 enhancement that bypasses the DRs of elementals and constructs essentially renders golems utterly useless at +1 enchantment - ridiculously OP and should be torn to smithereens. On the plus-side, conjuring forth a red blade of flame via bracers is pretty cool and the traveler's backpack will be a favorite for most wilderness adventures. So, all in all, solid section with some winners and some that obviously require significant nerfing.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are not on par with what Dreamscarred press usually delivers. If you're picky about proper rules-semantics, you'll find a lot to nitpick, which I tried to showcase in my excessive and nasty picking apart of sentences in the first section of the review. Layout adheres to Dreamscarred Press' two-column full-color standard and the pdf has copious full-color artworks - as mentioned above, ranging from gorgeous to horrifying. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.



You may have gotten a wrong impression from this review - I actually like this book.

No, really. I was honestly positively surprised by this pdf.



The signature abilities provided for the races, the unique, non-redundant fluff and the overall balancing of the races is great. No, really, I mean it. Alas, this book is also the very definition of flawed - almost every race had either a wording hiccup or one ability that just went beyond what would be considered balanced in all but high-powered tables. Essentially, I could play "look for the bit that's too strong" with a huge array of races I otherwise loved - races that feel more organic and viable than they have any right to, provided the limited room they each have. SO let me state this again:



This is a good book. The thing is, it could have easily been an OMG-HOW-AWESOME-IS-THAT-book. Literally all races and quite a bunch of the non-racial supplemental material borders on the awesome, only to swerve on the finishing line and get an unnecessary bent. The rules-language per se makes RAI clear in most cases, but also allows for copious misinterpretation due to being a tad bit less precise than it could be. Matt Medeiros, Jade Ripley and Andreas Rönnqvist have ultimately crafted a massive racial book that can be considered a nice addition to a given campaign - and one a moderately system-savvy DM can render utterly awesome by ironing out the rough patches. This book has all the potential you could ask for. At the same time, though, it has several supplemental components in dire need of nerfing, some races that obviously could have used some streamlining and is marred by craftsmanship that, while not bad in the traditional sense, does exhibit some flaws and deviations from the target goal.



What I'm trying to say is: I can see people hating and loving this book. If you tend to get hung up on peculiarities of rules-language, then this will provide some frustration for you. Same goes for groups seeking for a book to drop in as is - while that can be done, I'd only recommend it unsupervised for high-powered games. On the plus-side, the races do feel iconic, they can be cleaned of the problematic bits and a capable DM can adjust them with relative ease to a lower power-level. Oh, and they, and that cannot be under-emphasized, do not suffer from the sucky bloat of skill-enhancer racial traits (Get +2 to Skill A and B) that hound so many races since the ARG, instead providing something unique.



How to rate this, then? Well, honestly, I should probably go with 3 stars for this - the flaws are numerous and pronounced and then there's the inclusion of some broken pieces among the supplemental materials that are OP by any standard applied. However, at the same time, this book is much more inspired that I ever had hoped it would be. Both in its design and its concepts. And there are MANY awesome ideas, both in the fluff- and crunch-departments to be found. The downright brilliant mixed blood, the non-sucky blinkling...and so many more do not deserve a mediocre rating. And ultimately, I enjoyed this book too much for that, in spite of its flaws. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4, with an explicit caveat emptor for anyone picky about rules-language. DMs willing to do some tinkering will find a nice treasure-trove here - one that needs polish, yes, but one that can, eventually, be brought to shine.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Bloodforge
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Mini-Dungeon #003: Shrine of the Earth Barons
Publisher: AAW Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/17/2015 03:31:41
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map (alas, sans player-friendly version) and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked to d20pfsrd.com's shop and thus, absent from the pdf.



Since this product line's goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!



This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.



Still here?

All right!



The PCs find a capstone that opens to a dome that once housed a cabal of gnomish earth elementalists, now obliterated by a staff of power's breaking by a fanatical adversary. Rather awesome, the dungeon does sport moving teleportation vortexes as well as deadly, cool golems and earth-themed adversaries, often with interesting reskins to add a further sense of unique identity.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf, but there is no key-less version of the map to print out and hand to your players.



Stephen Yeardley delivers a concise, golem/earth-themed mini-dungeon with some pretty unique minor hazards - the keys, destruction etc. - all concisely-presented and surprisingly detailed for such a small pdf. Well worth a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #003: Shrine of the Earth Barons
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Mini-Dungeon #002: Hobgoblin Lair
Publisher: AAW Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/17/2015 03:29:28
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 2 pages and is a mini-dungeon. This means we get 2 pages content, including a solid map (alas, sans player-friendly version) and all item/monster-stats hyperlinked to d20pfsrd.com's shop and thus, absent from the pdf.



Since this product line's goal is providing short diversions, side-quest dungeons etc., I will not expect mind-shattering revelations, massive plots or particularly smart or detailed depictions, instead tackling the line for what it is. Got that? Great!



This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players may wish to jump to the conclusion.



Still here?

All right!



Herein, we receive the seasonal home of a bunch of goblinoid raiders led by a bugbear - as such, the place is rigged with an array of basic, conservative traps - and yes, their home does hide an old, Dwarven shrine. The details provided for the rooms per se are captivating, but on the downside, we do not receive stats for the boss Gorg (a bugbear warrior 2), so you'll need to do some quick stats.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes sans bookmarks, but needs none at this length. Cartography is full color and surprisingly good for such an inexpensive pdf, but there is no key-less version of the map to print out and hand to your players.



Beyond the lack of stats ( which are inherent in the format - I get that; But we could use a hyperlink to such a source) for the BBeG, this pdf represents, alas, what I feared to see from the series - while the pdf does provide more details than I would have expected from a two-page mini-dungeon, it also falls short of evoking a unique atmosphere. Jonathan Ely creates a solid goblinoid camp, with the traps you'd expect, but does not manage to create a truly evocative environment. This remains yet another low-level mini-goblin-themed dungeon - great if you need a small complex on the fly, otherwise pretty unremarkable. My final verdict will hence clock in at 2.5 stars - whether you round up or down depends heavily on whether you want such a pretty vanilla goblinoid camp or not - in the former case, round up, in the latter, round down. While personally, I got nothing from this pdf, I'll round up here due to in dubio pro reo.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon #002: Hobgoblin Lair
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Advanced Races 14: Lizardfolk (Pathfinder RPG)
Publisher: Kobold Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/16/2015 04:30:48
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Advanced Races-series clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 10 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



So, with the lizardfolk getting shafted in the ARG (apart from being used as an RP-example), we receive a full-blown depiction here - following the ARG, the lizardfolk receive +2 Str and Con, -2 Int (though I would have preferred the second bonus to fall on the mental attributes for a more versatile focus) , receive a swim speed of 15 ft (including +8 to Swim checks) and a 1d3 bite and two 1d4 claw primary natural attacks. They also receive +2 natural armor, can hold their breath longer and get +2 to Acrobatics. Know what - nothing to complain about, apart from the subtype not being "reptile" but "reptilian" as per the official terminology. Yeah, I know - cosmetic gripe - distinct, solid and suitable for any power-level. Kudos! And yes, I am aware that the damage for the natural attacks is non-standard for the size, but this decision actually maintains the balance of the race, so congrats for knowing when to deviate from the rules to maintain balance.

Better yet, the lizardfolk receive a plethora of alternate racial traits. Want to play climbing lizardfolk? Just replace swim speed with climb speed and holding your breath with the option to retrieve small objects carried on their person as a move action via prehensile tails. Nice! Alternatively, they can replace swim speed with burrow speed.



Minor chameleon capabilities (only when not moving) can be found alongside deathrolls (with better grappling) - and yes, lizardfolk can be large (or small for that matter), but pay for the increase to large size with a hefty fine of their cooler abilities. I tend to be very weary of large characters, but they did work well in playtests, even though my min-maxy players did make their reach count. Gliding lizardfolk and poison bites may be among the options you'd expect to find, but what about a 1/day blood-gout from the eyes, frightening targets? With the correct descriptor as mind-influencing fear-based, btw.! Oh, and yes, there are lizardfolk that can run across water - with concise mechanics. There is one option I am not 100% comfortable with - replacing only the +2 AC bonus with healing 1 hit point per minute. Depending on your campaign/class-combos, the infinite healing could become problematic - when e.g. the lizardfolk has a class that can reassign damage taken to itself, only time is a limit to the healing capacities. That being said, the slow rate may actually make this work for most campaigns, so yeah - tentatively and with said caveat, but still - an okay choice. Should it become problematic, I'd suggest having it cap at con-score (not bonus) times 3 hit points per day.



As a nice support bonus, three racial subtypes that can be created with these traits are spelled out for the discerning and time-starved gamer. Favored class options for barbarian, druid, hunter, ranger, shaman, skald, sorceror and witch can be found and are solid.



Among the racial archetypes, we get the ambush predator rogue, with deadly ambushes (providing enough preparation), full-round actions during the surprise round and scaling, better holding of one's breath. Simple, yet thematically-fitting archetype. The primitive weapons master fighter not only makes primitive weapons not suck via an array of diverse, passive abilities - the archetype also may substitute one of 9 first fighter abilities whenever he would receive a bonus feat - and these are very interesting. Broken Weapon, for example, allows the primitive weapon master to deal 10 hp of hardness-bypassing damage to a weapon before he confirms a critical hit to have it automatically be confirmed - the ability is great on an idea-level, but why not simply use the broken condition for the weapon? Another issue that may crop up here would be the possibility of indestructible or regenerating weapons/artifacts - a caveat for weaponry like this to avoid abuse would very much be in order. On the plus-side, making poisons, diseases etc. stick longer to a weapon is downright awesome. What about boomerang-style hits versus secondary targets after a miss? Bleed damage or weapon-damage-dice-size-increase (avoiding the hornet's nest that is proper size-increase) or armor that damages weapons that strike it - the abilities are generally diverse and thematically fitting, providing a distinct identity that sets the primitive fighter apart from the barbarian.



The Saurian Champion cavalier receives one of 6 dinosaur mounts and a very interesting ability - at higher levels, these Acrobatics-using cavaliers may have their attacks originate from somewhere within the mount's space - pretty interesting trick and pretty sure I haven't seen that one before - so yeah, neat. On the minor downside, the mounts are powerful (including assisted flight) - but then again, that is possible for small druids via core-rules AND the archetype receives no order or the tactician-progression, so balance-wise I'm fine. And in practice, this archetype turned out to be surprisingly cool. - come on, who doesn't like riding and tumbling accross the massive dinosaur one rides? Sanguine Scale witches can deal spell level damage to themselves or helpless targets to increase the CL by +1 and at high-levels, may thus even add metamagic feats. At 6th level, hexes may be powered by bleed damage while, allowing her to extend the duration of them (or her spells) in a cool alternative to cackle. That being said, while the effect thus enhanced needs to currently be in effect, an explicit disclaimer that this cannot target instantaneous effects would have been in order.



The story-keeper Skald archetype prepares spells like a bard, but needs no spellbook, learning all spells via rote memorization (take THAT bastard DMs à la moi, how enjoy destroying spellbooks) and a couple of nice ranging songs modifications - which are neat, though the formatting of them could have been a tad bit more clear - the song looks like its own ability, not a sub-ability of the extended list. That is, again a cosmetic glitch. Varied spellcasting and neat aiding others. The Pestilent Savage barbarians receive disease-laden bites (including rules for characters sans bite attacks!), better saves versus diseases and toxins, better damage-output and a minor debuff aura make for a solid archetype.



A total of 9 racial feats allows for savage assaults, including, potentially, multiple vital strikes via natural weapons for truly devastating bursts of destruction - but at the cost of exhaustion. I would have loved this otherwise cool idea to sport a caveat that makes it impossible to use this feat when the character can't become exhausted - it *is* possible, after all. Better flanking attacks, sprints during the surprise round, being more inscrutable - all interesting. I even like the feat that renders you immune versus an array of detrimental conditions and charms, but at the cost of never benefiting from morale bonuses. Making the tail a secondary attack, stealthy swimming and leaping charges - solid designs!



3 magical items, from a dinosaur-transformation skin to enchanted, minor con-damage dealing claws to a sight-enhancing mask, nothing to complain about here. 6 new spells, from affliction-suppressing brumation to inflicting cold susceptibility to targets to haruspex-style divination and a size-increasing dinosaur-like state of savagery. The star, though, would be the positive Waste Not spell, which provides bonuses for eating the remains of fallen allies. This one was LONG overdue. As any anthropologist can attest, cannibalism's taboo and stigmatization is a cultural phenomenon - while in our culture it is consider vile and the source of quite a few nasty myths that have enriched our cultural collective consciousness, in some societies, it actually denoted an explicit and distinct honor - and seeing this, in a non-evil way finally represented, is pretty great in my book.



As you may have noted, this pdf, alongside the former, belongs to the new school of Advanced Races-pdfs, with a more distinct focus on crunch, less so on fluff - hence, you won't find notes on child-rearing egg-laying or the like herein (imho a pity), but at least we do close the pdf with a nice, short and sweet fluff-only summary of a sample lizardfolk tribe.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good - I noticed no truly grievous glitches herein. Layout adheres to Kobold Press' beautiful two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. Artwork ranges from gorgeous full color to solid b/w.



Steven T. Helt, Stephen Rowe and Dan Dillon have established a pretty high quality standard for their work - one that here is reflected in one of the most refined Advanced Races-supplements to this date. While fluff-wise, there isn't much to be gleaned from this pdf, the mechanics are interesting - with a coupe few hiccups, the overall presentation is professional, balanced and interesting - the options provided belonging firmly in the subtle school of design. While most of them will not elicit immediate jubilation, they provide mechanically-relevant, intriguing alternatives. If there is one thing I can fault this pdf for, then it's that the format and design did not manage to render me jubilant about one given component - the pdf does not provide an obvious star, an OMG-how-awesome-is-that-at first-glance-crunch or cultural tidbit. What it does provide is a balanced race that should fit into any campaign and a damn cool dino-riding cavalier who is more interesting in play than the crunch would make you think on the page. While not perfect, it does not sport downright broken options and can be generally considered a well-worth addition to just about any given campaign. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, with the rare minor issues not being enough to rate this down - hence, rounded up to 5.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Advanced Races 14: Lizardfolk (Pathfinder RPG)
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Urban Dressing: War-Torn Town
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/16/2015 04:28:52
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of what I'd tentatively call the "new" Urban Dressing-series clocks in at 12 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let's take a look!



War is hell. War never changes...or does it? Before I drift off into Metal Gear Solid-esque ruminations on the nature of humanity and warfare, let's take a gander at rains of ash, coating everything under sooty grime, at the panorama of destruction that entails crows gnawing on the piled dead; echoes of whimpers resounding from the burnt buildings as priests bestow their blessings on those passing by.



Let's try to cheer up those droop-shouldered sentries before their life ends in an approximation of Erich Maria Remarque's legendary movie. Let's have our hearts torn asunder as infants ask their dads not to leave - all these and more can we find in the first 100-entry strong table of sights and sounds.



But let's be cynical...let's shop like there is no tomorrow, for war, when all is said and done, is also a business and weaponsmiths, charm-selling charlatans, supply depots and spy HQs all await our patronage, a diversion to spent the scant few copper pieces we earned - after all, who knows whether we'll have the option to spend them tomorrow? So, let us walk the streets of this war-sundered town and see whether we can find solace in the arms of a professional - but alas - no brothel to be found here. Only the mourners, orphanages bursting to the brim - that can be found herein, but no idle diversions among the 50 businesses for the poor sops about to lose their lives.



But fret not - amid the 50 folk of interest, such company can indeed be found - if you can find the people among the scavengers, weapon-engineers and bitter veterans . Just be careful that you don't run into a scar collector - who collects scars on other people... Just make sure you do what you came to do here, before the 20 complications hit - from toppling, burnt main-towers, hooligans, spies and planned executions of prisoners of war, there is a lot of things that can happen - and every occurrence may be the last...



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press' 2-column b/w-standard and the artwork is thematically fitting b/w-stock. The pdf comes fully bookmarked and in two versions - one optimized for the printer and one optimized for screen-use.



Josh Vogt's war-torn town weaves a fascinating tapestry of desolate destruction and the horrors of war. Thematically and mood-wise, this Urban Dressing is superb indeed. However, personally, I always felt drawn to the odd duality in war - at the one hand, Thanatos raging, at the other, Eros rising. Friendships and love forged in these most horrific of circumstances tend to last a lifetime and the drive to experience life to the fullest, hedonistic excess and the like, feel like they did not get enough room to shine herein. As far as the depiction of the bleakness of war goes, this is excellent. The psychological see-sawing, though, isn't captured as well. This does not mean this pdf is bad - quite the contrary. My prose-style review has hopefully shown you how flavorful this book is, though to me, it lacks the final je-ne-sais-quoi. hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars, just short of my seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Urban Dressing: War-Torn Town
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Mythic Minis 43: Mythic Rings
Publisher: Legendary Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/16/2015 04:27:03
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Gauss Ring: OMG, nerdgasm. So, this ring nets you electricity resistance 20, with a 60 max cap. However, when the ring has absorbed electricity, it nets you a bonus to attack and you can use the damage thus stored to have it discharge in melee or grapples, further penalizing foes foolish enough to tackle you. Beyond these cool functions, the ring’s capacity is further enhanced for mythic creatures, with more discharge at once and even discharges of devastating bursts of electricity. Now why is this item awesome? One, while it can be charged by low, gradual electricity damage, you deprive yourself of that absorption capacity, thus rendering it NOT cheesy and allowing for very flexible resource management. Secondly, the direct damage-charge expenditure may be a bit confusing at first glance, but becomes pretty simple upon closer examination. Only gripe – my pdf has a strike-through box in the text where a minus ought to be. Pfff, who cares – this ring is inspired in all the right ways!



-Ring of Returning: Automatically gets you back to your teleportation-origin. Kinda cool and solid, but DMs should take care – introducing these into a game might change the logic of e.g. magical assassins et al. and thus should be carefully contemplated.



-Ring of Truth: Essentially, a lawman’s ring, this makes it harder to fool the wearer with bluff or forgeries, allows you to discern lies and can also generate zones of truth, with the expected mythic upgrades. That would only be okay, were it not for a fun twist – the wearer can’t lie either. Very interesting twist that makes the ring stand out a bit above its base mechanical frame.



-Ring of Warmth: Helps against the cold, regenerates cold-inflicted damage (including non-lethal damage) and allows mythic characters to extend these benefits to an aura, with its radius dependant on the mythic power expended. Mythic spell-based protection versus the cold and dispelling effects based on cold complement the ring. Solid.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches apart from the minus-swallowing aforementioned relic. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



This pdf would pretty clearly be a 4 star-candidate – all rings herein are solid, have a nice idea or two that sets them apart from what otherwise would be conservative mechanics and with construction requirements, auras etc. all there, there’s not much to complain about. Sooo, this would be 3.5 or 4…were it not for the Gauss Ring. This beast takes up half the pdf and is its unmitigated star. The ring is awesome. Complex, yet easy to grasp. Innovative. Awesome. Love it. Really, really love it. Enough that I’ll make an item-class out of these in my home-game. It’s worth the asking price alone – and single-handedly raises the rating to 4.5, rounded up to 5. If you’re not interested in that ring, round down – but why wouldn’t you be? For mechanics-scavenging alone, this guy is beautiful!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 43: Mythic Rings
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

World of Obsidian Apocalypse: Life After Undeath (PFRPG)
Publisher: LPJ Design
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/15/2015 03:19:54
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This expansion to LPJr Design's glorious apocalypse-toolbox clocks in at 25 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, leaving 21 pages. Of these, one is a buff-sheet, 2 are devoted to a character-sheet, 1 to a combat/initiative tracker sheet and 1 to micro-monster-sheets, leaving us with 16 pages of content, so let's take a look!



We begin, as in the core-book for these apocalypses, with a very brief timeline of destruction in the last 100 years, explaining how things gradually became worse and worse - this time around, the very veil separating life from death has thinned - dangerously so. Sounds familiar? Well, this is essentially Obsidian Apocalypse's Ghostwalk. So how does this work?



When a character dies, he rolls 1d20 + level. If the result is 25+. the character becomes riven, rejecting the threshold of death. Riven change their type to undead (augmented humanoid), do not age, radiate an aura appropriate for the alignment, gain the unnatural aura ability and, they lose their constitution score, instead using Cha for fort-saves, special abilities etc. They thus also become immune to fort-save prompting saves unless they also affect objects. They are destroyed when reaching 0 HP and can heal damage on their own. Riven do not eat, drink, sleep or breathe and cannot reproduce or have sexual desires.

Now pretty interesting, the riven may progress in a kind of 10-level racial paragon class, with d8, 3/4 BAB-progression, good will-saves and they progress darkvision and continue to receive the numerous missing immunities the undead usually receive - in the first 3 levels. They also receive scaling channel resistance and natural armor. They also receive undead-themed spell-like abilities - alas, without specifying the CL - I assume = character level, but I'm not sure. Extremely interesting, the rive also receive a pain pool - the points in this pool can be used to heal creatures...I assume. Why? Because the Transfer Pain ability is terribly opaque. "First, as a standard action, the riven can touch an injured creature to heal it, adding points to his pain pool equal to the damage healed." - so, does this mean the riven takes the HP as damage? This, alas, is not specified. The Riven may then inflict damage equal to any number of points in the pain pool by executing a touch attack. The points last for cha-mod rounds, but have no caveat for expiring. So, what this effectively means is: INFINITE HEALING! For the whole party! BROKEN!!! URGH. This alone would be enough to disqualify the class in my games, but add the copious immunities at low levels and the lame high level abilities and we have a thoroughly unbalanced class that would have benefited from tighter control, a smoother dispersal of immunities... etc.



The second racial paragon class, the sundered, has one thing in common with the riven - it does not mention class skills per level or a list thereof. The Sundered are also undead, much like the riven, but they also receive the ethereal creature special ability. Note that they thus become immaterial and invisible. Permanently. It should be noted that such creatures, unless they utilize special tricks, cannot influence the material plane. This requires the sundered 10-level racial paragon-class, for example. Sundered can manifest character level times/day and maintain this for cha-mod rounds and the sundered remains incorporeal when manifested. At 10th level, sundered may manifest as physical creatures. The racial paragon-class receives d8, good will-saves, 3/4 BAB-progression. Alas, the immunities of these spirits utilize a similar, even more front-heavy ability progression, meaning that yes, I still consider this pretty broken. Now worse - ethereal as a constant ability means that the sundered, as depicted, will sit around, unable to interact with most material plane creatures, NPCs etc. - it's the spectator-race! Note that etherealness specifically is defined as being only influenced by force effects and abjurations originating on the prime material plane, BUT NOT vice versa. Yeah. Unpleasant.



Cooler would be the idea that undead gaining a level may see their soul and body severed, allowing for some overlap between the two races - which would be rather elegant, but note that the instant-death clause of the save can provide excessive frustration for the PLAYERS - you level up, botch one roll and die? This is design-wise not a good idea. Why not tie this whole mechanic to another, more linear mechanic and instead tie it to gradual HP-degradation, for example?



The pdf goes on to provide advice for handling undead PCs and how certain classes have their class features modified and a short, but relatively uninspired spectral crusader paladin archetype can be found. Next up would be an array of different racial feats for undead, riven and sundered. Cloaking your undead nature is pretty cool and stealing an item, bringing it into the ethereal is cool - but why should I pay for that when it's pretty much a necessary basic and required ability for the sundered? Extensions of the numerical abilities of the racial paragon class. Riven temporarily turning incorporeal, causing negative energy at touch, massive resistances to resist the severing - the feats generally are well-crafted, but a lot of them feel like they ought to have been included in the base race, instead of having the racial paragon classes spam undead immunities at low levels.



Magic item-wise, sundered wanting to use items will require a +2 new enchantment - which pretty much cripples their magic item arrays. We also receive 8 new specific magic items and, once again, they are pretty interesting, focused on dealing with the undead and spirits. A total of 4 very brief organization synopses can generally be considered neat, as can the 4 nice settlements.



The pdf closes with concise and generally, solid advice for DMs GMing the undead.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are pretty good on a formal level, I can't complain in that regard. Layout adheres to the gorgeous two-column full-color standard of Obsidian Apocalypse and the artwork is thematically-fitting, cool full-color stock. The pdf sports no bookmarks.



Rich Redman is a great designer, yes. And yes, I am pretty much a total fanboy of Obsidian Apocalypse and Ghostwalk. Alas, this pdf does not manage to really blend these well - Don't get me wrong: I love the blending it does and the fluff, the idea to codify the undead immunities in the racial paragon class - I just wished the immunities and classes were more smooth in their ability-grants. I wished the sundered would actually work - the whole ethereal ability dooms the character to passivity for most of the time, which is just a bad decision. Why not eliminate immunities and go incorporeal instead? That would still be a unique playing experience and once you could easily balance. As written, the base races at the heart of this product have issues and that radiates outwards. However, it should be noted that the supplemental material herein is pretty much cool and inspired, but also flawed. The pdf can be a neat scavenging ground, but alas, falls short of true excellence, with missing skills etc. No FCOs for the races, no alternate racial abilities - all of these show quite clearly the potential which is instead covered by feats, imposing an unnecessarily steep feat-tax. Balancing could have been much smoother here. Still, at the end, I can't bring myself to dislike this book - it does have some cool ideas, unrefined though the crunch may be. My final verdict hence will clock in at 2.5 stars, rounded up by a margin.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
World of Obsidian Apocalypse: Life After Undeath (PFRPG)
Click to show product description

Add to Flames Rising PDF Store Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 1721 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
Back
You must be logged in to rate this
0 items
Powered by DrivethruRPG